BACHELOR LEVEL (AQF 7)

B7120 – Introduction to the Old Testament 

This course unit aims to introduce students to the literary forms, historical and cultural contexts and theological themes of the Old Testament. It seeks to provide a foundation for further biblical and theological study.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1) demonstrate a general understanding of the overall structure and contents of the Old Testament
2) identify the literary shape, themes, social and historical background of the individual books of the Old Testament
3) employ critical methodologies in the interpretation of Old Testament texts.
4) access secondary literature
5) convey the relevance of the Old Testament to Christian life and the contemporary world

A threshold concept to be acquired in this unit is:
The books of the Old Testament are works of literature, written and received in a particular historical period, for a distinct religious purpose.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Introduction to the Canon
2. Introductory questions of each book of the Old Testament (authorship, date, historical, political and cultural contexts, etc.)
3. Structure and outline of the major books of the Old Testament
4. Literary genres of Old Testament literature
5. Key theological themes of the Old Testament collection
6. Critical approaches to Old Testament interpretation

B7130 – Introduction to the New Testament 

This course unit introduces students to the critical study of the New Testament, its literary forms, historical and cultural contexts and theological themes. It provides a solid foundation for further biblical and theological study.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1) demonstrate a sound knowledge of the contents of the New Testament
2) display a sound understanding of the historical, social and cultural context of the New Testament
3) demonstrate basic exegetical skills in critical interpretation of New Testament texts
4) access and use significant secondary literature
5) apply the fruits of New Testament studies to a range of life and ministry situations

A threshold concept to be acquired in this unit is:
The books of the New Testament are works of literature, written and received in a particular historical period, for a distinct religious purpose.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Outline of the books of the New Testament
2. Historical, cultural, political and religious contexts of the New Testament materials
3. Approaching the books of the New Testament as literary works
4. Key methodologies of Biblical interpretation
5. Developing skills in exegesis and writing an exegetical essay
6. Key New Testament themes

B7203 – Hermeneutics

This course unit aims to introduce students to the history, goals and general principles of biblical interpretation with attention paid to the recognition and interpretation of the various literary genres in the Bible.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
6) demonstrate a sound knowledge of general hermeneutical principles
7) demonstrate a clear understanding of sound principles used in interpreting Scripture
8) evaluate a broad range of approaches used in interpreting Scripture
9) apply appropriate hermeneutical principles to biblical texts
10) appreciate the diversity of interpretative approaches used in the interpretation of the Scriptures within the Christian tradition

A threshold concept to be acquired in this unit is:
The Bible is the word of God, composed by human authors under the guidance of the Holy Spirit in order to communicate the good news of God’s revelation to human readers. It therefore should be interpreted according to normal rules of literary interpretation.

The content of this subject includes:
1. The need for biblical hermeneutics.
2. Terms of reference used in biblical hermeneutics.
3. The history of biblical hermeneutics.
4. Key issues in biblical interpretation.
5. General hermeneutical principles.
6. The application of hermeneutical principles to specific genres of biblical literature.
7. The application of hermeneutics to life and ministry issues.

 

B7214 – Studies in the Pentateuch

This course unit builds on the foundation unit(s) by examining the forms and content of the Pentateuch. It does so in light of its historical, cultural and religious settings and explores the role of the Pentateuch within the canon and the life of Israel.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
6) summarize the significant critical issues associated with the study of the Pentateuch including its formation, unity and history
7) identify the themes found within the Pentateuch and their relationships to the development of Israel’s faith
8) exegete selected passages from the Pentateuch
9) analyse literary forms and the contribution these forms make to understanding the text
10) demonstrate the application of a theme or text to a contemporary audience or community

The content of this subject includes:
6. Formation and composition of the Pentateuch
7. Historical, cultural, religious and political context of the Pentateuch
8. Literary forms within the Pentateuch and their influence on interpretation
9. Theological themes found within the Pentateuch
10. Exegesis of selected passages within the Pentateuch

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Pentateuch

B7231 – Prophetic Literature

This course unit builds on the knowledge and skills developed in Intro to the Old Testament. It examines the literary forms and theological content of Israel’s prophetic books, with due consideration of their historical, cultural and religious settings/contexts. In particular, it seeks to recognise the unique character of the prophetic literature of the Bible and the theological consequences of the different character of these writings.

By the successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of the critical issues associated with the study of prophetic literature
2. Show how various prophetic literary forms communicate their theological content
3. Exegete selected passages from prophetic books
4. Utilise the relevant secondary literature in a critical manner
5. Apply insights of prophetic literature to various aspects of teaching, ministry, and spirituality

Content
1. Developing an appropriate context for the study of prophetic literature
2. Study of prophetic literary forms and their content/themes
3. Exegesis of selected texts from prophetic books
4. Aspects of the theology of prophetic books

B7273 – The Four Gospels

This Course Unit builds on the Biblical Studies introductory units by investigating the principal literary, historical and theological features of the four Gospels through exegetical methodologies.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. demonstrate knowledge of the historical, socio-cultural and religious background of the four Gospels
2. identify the main literary forms and theological themes of the four Gospels
3. employ exegetical methodologies in formal essay style on selected passages from the Gospels
4. access and use sound secondary scholarship on the Gospels
5. integrate their acquired knowledge into preaching, liturgy and spiritual leadership

The content of this subject includes:
1. Placing Jesus in his historical, cultural, and religious context.
2. Contemporary historical-critical methodologies for studying the Gospels.
3. The Quest for the Historical Jesus.
4. The principal literary features and themes of each Gospel.
5. Practical exercise in exegesis of a selection from one Gospel.
6. Application of critically researched knowledge of the Gospels to various ministry contexts.

 

B7364 – Pauline Literature

This course unit builds on the knowledge and skills developed in the prerequisite Biblical Studies units. It examines the historical context, literary forms and theological content of the New Testament literature associated with Paul.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. describe the various social, cultural and pastoral contexts of each of Paul’s letters
2. identify the key Pauline theological themes
3. demonstrate well-developed hermeneutical and exegetical skills in critical essays on
selected passages from the Pauline letters
4. integrate significant secondary literature into the critical study of Pauline literature
5. incorporate insights from Pauline literature to a range of life and ministry situations

The content of this subject includes:
1. Paul’s background and conversion
2. Introduction to the Pauline literature: historical, geographical, social and religious factors
3. Literary structure, style and purpose of the Pauline letters
4. Key Pauline theological themes
5. Exegesis of selected passages from the Pauline literature
6. The ‘new perspective’ debate in current scholarship

T7101 – Introduction to Theology

This course unit introduces students into the nature and tasks of theology and to theological methodology. It provides a foundation for all future theology course units.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the nature and purpose of theology
2. Identify and explain the doctrinal presuppositions that are the foundation for theology
3. Analyse the writing of several theological thinkers and key theological texts, ancient and modern
4. Make use of an appropriate methodology for particular theological tasks
5. Apply the skills of theological reflection to life in the community of faith

The threshold concept to be acquired in this unit is that theology is an engagement with the data of revelation, using reason and the entire conscience of the person as well as prayer.

The content of this subject includes:
1. The nature and purpose of theology
2. Overview of history of theology
3. Theological method
4. Presuppositions for doing theology
5. Context for theology
6. The vocation of the theologian

T7195 – Introduction to Transformational Discipleship
This unit explores the significance of Jesus’ revolutionary Kingdom vision for understanding discipleship and spiritual formation. When Jesus came proclaiming the good news that the Kingdom is now available, His aim was not just to get people into heaven in the end – it is to get heaven into people from the start! Following Jesus involves developing an integrated practical theology of Kingdom participation that informs our whole of life interaction with God. Understanding more about Jesus’ incarnational and relational Way of transforming us profoundly affects how we then serve and lead others in our local and particular contexts.

CURRICULUM OBJECTIVES
This undergraduate unit explores theological approaches to spiritual formation and discipleship that are consistent with Jesus’ Kingdom vision and ministry. Following Jesus involves developing an integrated practical theology of apprenticeship into Kingdom living. Jesus’ relational and particular Way of transforming us profoundly affects how we then lead others.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

1) Discover theological approaches to discipleship and spiritual formation that are consistent with Jesus’ Kingdom vision and ministry.

2) Explore the importance of the Trinitarian nature of God for understanding Christian spiritual formation.

3) Explain how Jesus’ life and ministry enables authentic participation in God’s Kingdom.

4) Identify an integrated practical theology of discipleship.

5) Evaluate how apprenticeship into Kingdom living transforms our leadership.

CONTENT
1. Theological approaches to discipleship and spiritual formation based on the life of Jesus.

2. The Trinitarian nature of God as the foundation for Christian spiritual formation.

3. The significance of Jesus’ life and ministry for authentic participation in God’s Kingdom.

4. Integrating a practical theology of discipleship.

5. How Kingdom living transforms our leadership.

T7217 – The Church

This unit is designed to introduce the student to the function, purpose, and mission of the church and to explore from a theological perspective why engaging in the church is not an optional extra for the Christian life but its very lifeblood.

Content
1. Becoming the People of God
2. Who’s in? Who’s out?
3. What is the Church?
4. The Church and the Kingdom of God
5. Christ – the Head of the Church
6. The Sacramental Function of the Church
7. Sacrament Case Study (1) – Communion
8. Sacrament Case Study (2) – Baptism
9. The Mission of the Church
10. The Future of the Church

T7231 – The Person and Work of Christ

This course unit is designed to provide students with an understanding of the person and saving work of Jesus Christ. It seeks to explore this understanding in the light of contemporary Christian thought and life.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. demonstrate an understanding of the person and saving work of Christ in the New Testament;
2. demonstrate a critical awareness of the evolution of Christological and soteriological doctrine.
3. analyze source documents and theological literature relevant to Christology and Soteriology;
4. critically explore issues in Christology and Soteriology in the context of contemporary culture and religion; and,
5. apply Christological and Soteriological insights to the Christian spiritual life and discipleship.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Methodological issues and/or foundational concepts in Christology and Soteriology
2. Christological and Soteriological themes in the New Testament
3. The evolution of Christological and Soteriological doctrine
4. The development of the theological understanding of the person and saving work of Jesus Christ
5. Contemporary issues in Christology and Soteriology
6. Implications for Ecclesiology and the Christian Life

T7320 – Theology for Ministry
This course unit enables students to explore what it means to minister in the Church in the modern world. It will assist them to reflect on the foundations for their own practise of ministry.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. demonstrate a well developed understanding of the relationship between ministry and the mission of the Church
2. research and analyse the history and present shape of ministry in the Church
3. articulate a theology of church and ministry that takes account of the ecumenical consensus and of their particular ecclesial context
4. develop a response to contemporary challenges
5. apply the theology of ministry in a collaborative ecclesial context

The content of this subject includes:
1. Ministry in Scripture and in the first Christian communities
2. The ministry of the church as the whole people of God
3. Theologies of ordination
4. The relationship between lay and ordained ministry
5. Ministry and leadership in ecclesial communities
6. An ecumenical perspective on ministry in the Church

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Ministry in the Church

T7333 – The Trinity

The purpose of this unit is to focus exclusively on, and examine systematically, the Church’s teaching on the mystery of the Holy Trinity, a doctrine that stands at the very heart of Christian belief. In so doing it will want to demonstrate the profound soteriological and existential consequences of this doctrine to the way Christians live their life.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1) Demonstrate a sound knowledge of the key themes in the doctrine of the Trinity;
2) identify the key biblical features of this doctrine and its trajectory into the Patristic and/or modern traditions;
3) Critically review, analyse, and synthesise knowledge current literature on the Trinity;
4) show an ability to articulate a doctrine of the Trinity for a contemporary reader;
5) apply the doctrine of the Trinity to Christian living today

The threshold concept to be acquired in this unit is the importance of the Trinitarian doctrine for Christian living

The content of this subject includes:
1. Biblical foundations of the doctrine of the Holy Trinity; Old and New Testaments
2. The historical developments of the Trinitarian doctrine
3. Modern understandings of the Trinity
4. Systematic considerations: for example, persons, essence/substance, koinonia
5. Salvific and existential implications
6. Contemporary Trinitarian theology: problems and perspectives

T7396 – Biblical Answers for Life’s Questions
This course unit introduces students to the foundations of Christian ethics from the biblical sources. It identifies critical issues for Christian ministry in an amoral culture, providing students with a framework for theological reflection and a platform upon which to base their missional and pastoral ministries.

By the successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

1. Demonstrate a critical awareness of the foundations of Christian ethics from the biblical sources.
2. Identify a range of Christian and non-Christian approaches to ethics.
3. Formulate a defence of Christian ethics in an amoral culture.
4. Incorporate a distinctly biblical “ethic” into the ministries.
5. Appreciate the Christian community as the harbinger of the values of the kingdom of God.
6. Value the importance of ethical behaviour as the link-point between faith and practice.

The content for this subject includes:
1. Greek Philosophy and Classical approaches to Ethics
2. Old Testament Ethical Foundations
3. New Testament Foundations: Jesus and the Gospels
4. New Testament Foundations: Paul and the early Church
5. Ethical Models and their Practical Outworking
6. Approaches to Ethical Decision-Making as a Christian: Models, Mandates, Missions
7. Just War: its Christian Roots and Contemporary Issues
8. Life Issues: Abortion and Euthanasia
9. Sexuality in a Pornographic World
10. Responding to the Oppressed of the World
11. A Theological Response to Consumerism
12. Towards a Biblically-Grounded Christian “Ethical Theology” for Christian Ministry Praxis

 

 

H7100 – Introduction to Christian History

This course unit introduces the student to the discipline of church history and provides an overview of significant historical periods and themes and the variety of methodological approaches to them.

At the end of this unit students will be able to
6) Demonstrate knowledge of a number of key events in the Church’s past
7) Understand a number of approaches to researching, constructing and interpreting the past
8) Distinguish between primary and secondary source materials and use such sources appropriately
9) Show how historical knowledge provides a necessary context for theological studies
10) Construct and support a coherent historical argument in written form, according to the methodological conventions of the discipline.

Students need to be able to grasp the concept that history is not just a chronological description of events but involves an interpretive element and a range of methodological approaches.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Introducing the discipline of church history
2. Research tools for the study of church history
3. Methodologies in the study of church history
4. Introducing the work of influential historians
5. Overview of significant shaping events and periods in the history of Christianity
6. Case studies of historical periods utilizing a number of methods.

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Introduction to the Study of Christian History.

H7294 – Study Tour
Israel, the Holy Land, or Palestine are names used by different people to described the same place – a place that is important to three of the world’s major faiths. This unit is based around your trip to Jordan and Israel and the opportunity that will provide you to connect what you will see with that which you have only ever read about.

This subject is designed to support your Tour in two ways;
1. Preparing you and your expectations for what you will experience on this Tour

2. Creating a historical framework in which to interpret and appreciate all that you will learn and experience.

CURRICULUM OBJECTIVES
This unit aims to provide students with the opportunity to spend a significant period of time in one or more remote locations relevant to the biblical, theological, historical or ministry narrative of theological texts and/or movements, in order to understand the impact of such locations on the interpretation of those narratives.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Identify key contextual features which have contributed to the field under study;
2. Explain the significance of local historical, geographical or cultural features in promoting or limiting the particular narrative within the field under study;
3. Analyse a specific topic within the field under study in terms of its local origin and development;
4. Reflect on the impact of the travel experience on their personal development within the field under study;
5. Produce a presentation depicting the connection between the location visited and the narrative within the field under study.

CONTENT
Section A: Preparation

Students will gain a familiarity with the historical elements of major sites to be visited. This will involve a significant guided reading program, which has been prepared by the college. This material is provided in the 5 Sessions of the Unit.

Section B: Tour
Students will spend two weeks in the Holy Land, under approved faculty supervision and direction, to explore the historical significance of key sites.
The Tour will include;
1. Lectures, visits, meetings with significant local people and cultural experiences in a cohesive program lead by an ACOM endorsed faculty member.
2. A Journal as part of the documentary evidence for the Study Tour experience
3. A final presentation and reflection detailing the key elements and significance of the Tour.

The SCD Guidelines for Study Tours are to be followed.

H7365 – The Restoration Movement
This course unit assists students to study the background, inauguration and development of the Restoration Movement, focussing on the relationship between Christian liberty in non-essentials and concerns for Christian union and restoration of NT authority.

At the end of this unit students will be able to
1) assess the origins, nature and aims of the Restoration movement
2) construct an historical narrative of the Stone-Campbell movement and the British Churches of Christ movement, based on primary and secondary sources, situating them in their nineteenth century context
3) account for the Restoration Movement’s global spread
4) analyse the contribution of the Restoration Movement to the Ecumenical Movement
5) articulate the theological emphases of the Restoration Movement

Students need to be able to grasp the concept that history is not just a chronological description of events but involves an interpretive element and a range of methodological approaches.

1) The nineteenth century Evangelical and Revivalist context of the Stone-Campbell and Churches of Christ movements.
2) The origins and development of the Restoration Movement in America and Great Britain
3) The origins of the Restoration Movement in Australia and New Zealand
4) The development of the theology of the Restoration Movement
5) The literature and controversies of the Restoration Movement

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: History of the Restoration Movement

A7101 – Critical Thinking and Writing

This foundational course unit provides structured, practical instruction in the nature and skills of critical thinking and writing in a theological context. It is an excellent course for beginning students, especially for those who have not studied at higher education level recently. Although overall critical thinking and writing skills will be taught, the primary application of these skills will be in the area of writing excellent essays.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. explain the nature of critical thinking , memory, and the relationship between thought and knowledge
2. critically analyse arguments and identify deductively valid conclusions
3. explore that nature of creative thinking
4. demonstrate the application of basic critical thinking skills to research, essay writing etc.
5. show an understanding of thinking as hypothesis testing

The content for this subject includes:
1. Critical Thinking
2. The acquisition, retention and retrieval of knowledge, including theological knowledge
3. Reasoning: critical construction, drawing deductively valid conclusions, assessing relevance of arguments and sources
4. Analysis arguments
5. Analysing qualitative and quantitative data
6. Critical thinking in research and writing
7. Accessing and assessing research sources and databases
8. Organising research findings
9. Conventions and presentation

A7130 – Introduction to Biblical Languages

This course unit gives an introduction to biblical Hebrew and Greek that will enable students to use various grammatical and lexical tools without requiring a fluency in the language. This will enable them to use with discernment English-language translations for exegesis.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1) Recognise the alphabet and language structure of biblical Hebrew and Greek
2) Understand the nuances of the grammatical structures of the biblical languages
3) Utilise an English language translation and various grammatical/lexical tools in exegesis
4) Apply such tools to the exegesis of selected biblical passages
5) Apply the results of their study to enrich Christian life and ministry

The content for this subject includes:
1) Introductory hermeneutical theory
2) Translation theory and practice
3) Introducing biblical Hebrew and Greek
4) Parts of speech and language structure
5) Simple sentence diagramming
6) Using reference works and word studies
7) Evaluating and using English language translations
8) Sample exegesis from an OT and an NT book

S7101 – Spiritual Formation 1

This course unit promotes, in a foundational way, the personal and spiritual awareness and growth of students, establishing a the affective and vocational dimensions of self-knowledge.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Outline a broad and coherent knowledge of emotional intelligence as at applies to spiritual maturity.
2. Interpret their spiritual and developmental journey as a demonstration of God’s presence in their life.
3. Explore and evaluate the fruit of key spiritual disciplines.
4. Demonstrate accountability in practicing principles of spiritual self- care.
5. Adapt and apply knowledge of spiritual growth in the accompaniment of others.

The threshold concept to be acquired in this unit is self-awareness as the foundation of spiritual growth; and Spiritual formation as a developing process.

The content of this subject includes:
1) Compilation of personal narrative
2) Biblical foundations of spiritual maturity
3) Relevant psychological themes to Christian spirituality
4) Character and virtue
5) Relationships and spirituality
6) Vocational discernment
7) Basic spiritual disciplines and practices

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Formation in Spiritual Living

All Spiritual Formation units involve a three day retreat. This retreat revolves around telling life stories in the confidentiality of your Formation Group (4 – 8 students). You may well find these life stories challenging, encouraging or simply moving- not necessarily easy to tell or hear, but vital for growth both individually and as a group.

Attendance at the retreat is compulsory for this unit, and an assessable reflective paper will be written on your experiences there.

The retreat is a highlight of the student’s spiritual formation year. Formation groups are not open for additional students to join after the retreat has been held.

Note: Retreat registration occurs automatically when you register for Spiritual Formation (there is no additional cost to attend the retreat).

S7102 – Introduction to Christian Spirituality

This subject introduces students to the study of Christian Spirituality, focussing on the biblical, theological and historical foundations of Christian Spirituality, and their application to ministry and mission through the art of soul-care.

By the successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

1. Elucidate a clear understanding of what is meant by the term ‘spirituality’;
2. Identify the historical and cultural influences upon the development of Christian spirituality;
3. Distinguish the nature of Christian Spirituality and sketch its primary characteristics;
4. Evaluate various kinds of spiritual disciplines or practices within the Christian tradition against their biblical and theological foundations;
5. Apply insights from a variety of expressions in Christian spirituality to their own spiritual formation and practice.

S7201 – Spiritual Formation 2

This unit explores the dynamics of influential relationships and their impact on ones faith and spiritual formation. It assists the student in taking initiative in the development of collaborative relationships as well as expressing healthy communication skills in the development of their relationships with others as well as with God.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1) Outline the degree to which significant relationships in their early developmental years have contributed towards their spiritual formation.
2) Articulate and apply a body of knowledge, which assesses the self-concept as formed by influential relationships and their developing notion of God as ‘other’, and the link between the two.
3) Identify key elements in healthy emotional expressions within their relationships.
4) Scrutinize personal communication skills in offering spiritual hospitality to others.
5) Practice a range of self management skills and spiritual virtues in their communication and relationships with others.

The threshold concept to be acquired in this unit is that spiritual virtue empowers the building of healthy relationships.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Formative relationships in early life
2. The power of words & life commandments shaping our formation
3. Emotional regulation in relationships
4. Sexuality and the virtue of chastity as respect of others
5. Building a mature and prayerful relationship with God
6. Spiritual formation through others : Spiritual Direction and mentoring
7. Spiritual virtues empowering relationship

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Relational Dynamics in Spiritual Formation

All Spiritual Formation units involve a three day retreat. This retreat revolves around telling life stories in the confidentiality of your Formation Group (4 – 8 students). You may well find these life stories challenging, encouraging or simply moving- not necessarily easy to tell or hear, but vital for growth both individually and as a group.

Attendance at the retreat is compulsory for this unit, and an assessable reflective paper will be written on your experiences there.

The retreat is a highlight of the student’s spiritual formation year. Formation groups are not open for additional students to join after the retreat has been held.

Note: Retreat registration occurs automatically when you register for Spiritual Formation (there is no additional cost to attend the retreat).

S7301 – Spiritual Formation 3

This unit develops the context of personal spiritual formation as intentional preparation for Christian ministry. It further extends the students capacity to contemplate formational challenge and manage unique issues related to life of a minister.

At the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1) Critique the role of a contemporary Christian minister and categorize vital formational aspects related to the enhancement of this vocation.
2) Forecast key transformational and transitional phases a life of ministry
3) Process ministry failure and the formational invitations its presents.
4) Generate significant self-awareness using reflective practices to establish vocational clarity.
5) Formulate and organize a discernment process that manages and interprets ministry challenges

The content of this subject includes:
1) The vocational call to ministry
2) Transition in life and ministry
3) Challenges in ministry failure
4) Emotional & mental health in the minister
5) Personal & professional reflection practices: retreating, communal discernment

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Spiritual Formation For Ministry

All Spiritual Formation units involve a three day retreat. This retreat revolves around telling life stories in the confidentiality of your Formation Group (4 – 8 students). You may well find these life stories challenging, encouraging or simply moving- not necessarily easy to tell or hear, but vital for growth both individually and as a group.

Attendance at the retreat is compulsory for this unit, and an assessable reflective paper will be written on your experiences there.

The retreat is a highlight of the student’s spiritual formation year. Formation groups are not open for additional students to join after the retreat has been held.

Note: Retreat registration occurs automatically when you register for Spiritual Formation (there is no additional cost to attend the retreat).

S7396 – Discerning God’s Will Together
 This unit explores the practices and principles of seeking after God’s will as a community. How does God guide us individually, as a team, an organisation or even a movement? How can we best open ourselves to God so that we collectively hear Him?

Further information on this subject will be released at a later date.

L7100 – Introduction to Christian Worship

This course unit introduces students to concepts that provide a foundation for the study of Christian worship.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1) Demonstrate a knowledge of the biblical, theological, cultural and historical foundations for the practice of Christian worship within a particular tradition
2) Demonstrate a knowledge of the current issues within Christian worship
3) Use a wide range of liturgical resources
4) Prepare and conduct a range of liturgical services
5) Differentiate the riches of the Christian liturgical traditions

The content of this subject includes:
1. The biblical basis for Christian worship
2. The theology of Christian worship
3. The role of culture in the development of worship
4. The historical developments in Christian worship
5. Current issues in Christian worship
6. Preparation of a Christian worship service

L7220 – Preaching 1

This unit provides an introduction to the art and science of preaching. Principally students will be taught one clear style of preaching, the strategy outlined by Andy Stanley in his book, our text for the unit, Communicating for a Change. Although this is very simple it allows enormous diversity in practice. This unit will be helpful for people who have never preached and those with years of experience.

Critical to the unit will be the experience of preaching to a live audience in a facilitation with other students. For those who cannot get to a facilitation, another live audience will need to be found. The audience then will then be asked to complete feedback forms and your video will need to be recorded and uploaded to youtube or similar. This will be all be a valuable experience, as you will receive helpful, encouraging, positive feedback that will help you to see sides of your preaching that you are blind to.

This unit starts with the foundation that preaching is important, the gospel is life-changing and God’s word is worth proclaiming. Please take the time to learn the art and science of preaching well.

By the successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

1. apply theological and theoretical principles to distinguish quality preaching of homilies/sermons
2. examine a service of worship and explain the place of the homily/sermon
3. differentiate between written discourse and oral discourse and explain their interrelationship
4. demonstrate several preaching styles
5. prepare and deliver sermons / homilies that exhibit a basic structure that fits the context

SESSIONS TOPIC
1 The Goal of Preaching
2 Method, Manner and Megaphones
3 The Big Idea
4 Outlines and Maps
5 Know Your Stuff
6 Engaging Your Audience
7 Know Your Audience
8 Develop Your Own Style
9 Finding the Big Idea
10 Missional Preaching

L7320 – Preaching 2

This course unit examines preaching in its social and cultural context.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. appraise contemporary social and cultural context, extrapolate future trends, and comment on the place of preaching
2. explain the principles underlying effective preaching in particular contexts
3. design sermons or homilies incorporating variations in style and structure
4. critique sermons or homilies with reference to their social and cultural context
5. preach sermons or homilies that effectively communicate in different contexts.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Contextual issues in preaching
2. 21st Century: post-modern, post-structural, pseudo-modern?
3. Styles of preaching: cognitive and affective; inductive and deductive
4. Structures in preaching: declarative, pragmatic, narrative, visionary, integrative
5. Communication techniques and context

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Preaching and Context

M7109 – Introduction to Discipleship

This unit will introduce students to Biblically grounded and culturally adapted approaches to following Jesus in the contemporary context. It will investigate theories and practices of discipleship, spiritual transformation and disciple making for the 21st century.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. analyse the Biblical material and theological issues relating to discipleship
2. explain why and how different approaches to making disciples are employed in differing cultural and contextual situations.
3. explain the role and place of a disciple in the public arena
4. develop a discipleship pathway for a given setting
5. reflect upon the foundational importance and practical application of discipleship to Christian life and ministry

The content of this subject includes:
1. The Biblical basis for discipleship
2. Disciple making as a lifestyle
3. The influence of society and culture on discipleship
4. The role of spiritual practices in the maturity and development of a disciple.
5. A strategy for disciple making in the local congregation.
6. From personal growth to community transformation.

M7205 – Paradigms for Contemporary Mission

This course unit aims to introduce the student to the paradigm shifts required to recast the church in a genuinely missional stance in western cultural contexts.

At the end of this course unit students should be able to:
1) demonstrate a broad understanding of the significant cultural shifts that have occurred over the last few centuries, and the various responses of the church to these
2) demonstrate a developed understanding of a genuinely missional ecclesiology
3) display a well-developed ability to analyse culture and identify points of contact with the gospel
4) articulate a genuinely missional ecclesiology and show a commitment to achieve greater relevance to today’s non-Christian world.
5) Critically discuss the ‘remissionalisation’ of the church.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Theological Considerations
1.1. Christology and Incarnational Mission
1.2. Towards a Missional Ecclesiology
1.3. Justice and Integrity in Mission
2. Cultural Considerations and Mission
2.1. Major Shifts in Modern History
2.2. Chaos and Complexity
3. Tools for Missional Revolution
3.1. Viable Models Characteristics of the Missional Church
3.2. Action Learning Systems
3.3 Creativity and Imagination

M7285 – Cross-Cultural Mission

This course unit explores worldview and intercultural communication from theological and practical perspectives. It will help students understand their own worldviews and those of others, and assist them in effective cross-cultural ministry and mission at home or abroad.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. explain the concept of culture and foundational principles of cross-cultural communication;
2. demonstrate a broad understanding of the theological and theoretical foundations of cross cultural ministry;
3. evidence developing skill in analysing cross-cultural situations and discerning underlying assumptions and values;
4. develop strategies to cope with the complexities of cross-cultural ministry or mission;
5. apply a growing understanding of culture and worldview to the communication of Christian faith across cultural barriers

The basic anthropological distinction between form and function is critical to cross-cultural communication. Words or behaviours can mean different things in different cultures, and we must not assume they have the same meaning in another culture as they would in ours. The danger lies in equating our interpretation of observed behaviours with their actual meaning in another cultural context.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Biblical precedents for cross-cultural mission
2. Developing a theology of cross-cultural ministry and mission
3. Understanding culture and worldview; models of culture types
4. Identifying and understanding one’s own culture and worldview
5. Culture shock and reverse culture shock
6. Introduction to communication theory; dangers of miscommunication
7. Aspects of cross-cultural communication, including language and non-verbal communication; influence of social structures on communication; relationship of medium and message; and the distinction between form and function
8. Church and culture
9. Contextualisation, indigenisation and enculturation in cross-cultural ministry and mission
10. Dealing with prejudice, racism and cross-cultural conflict

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Introduction to Cross-Cultural Mission

 

M7395- Hermeneutics for Mission

This course unit provides an overview of contextualisation and missional hermeneutics. Focus is given to models, tools, processes and case studies for interpreting Scripture inter-culturally, appreciating global theology, and contextualising theology and ministry for various local contexts.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Models and maps of contextualisation
2. Biblical mandate for contextualisation
3. Missional hermeneutics
4. Guidelines and limits for contextualisation
5. Comprehensive and critical contextualisation
6. Conceptual tools for contextualising theology
7. Case studies from Australia and globally: facilitators, guides, heralds, pathfinders, prophets and restorers
8. Future trajectories
9. Applying contextualisation to student contexts

M7395 – Missional Spirituality
This unit will focus on the specific spirituality issues faced by people involved in pioneering mission to emerging global cultures. In relational to spirituality, it will relate to finding God outside the church and in strange places. Christian spirituality has been so tied to a Christendom mode of church, and as a result that we have become dualistic in our understanding of God, church and world. We divide life into sacred and secular, and God is found in one but not the other. This unit will seek to address this issue directly and help the student to reconceive his/her relationship to God and the world in a more holistic and biblical way.
We will also explore the nature and essential character of discipleship in relation to the cultural situations and the alternative religions of our day. We will focus particularly on consumerism as the major religious alternative to Christianity in our day.
Finally, because missional work is difficult, we will explore the whole concept of sustainability – staying in there for the long haul and developing disciplines and structures for sustainable mission.This unit presents new models of spirituality, consistent and sustainable for mission in a post-modern context.
The original Content Providers who wrote this unit are Alan Hirsch, Michael Frost and Darren Cronshaw.HIGHLY RECOMMENDED READING
Beaudoin, Tom, Virtual Faith: The Irreverent Spiritual Quest of Generation X (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1998).
Frost, Michael, Eyes Wide Open: Seeing God in the Ordinary (Sydney: Albatross, 1998).
Frost, Michael, and Hirsch, Alan, The Shaping of Things to Come: Innovation and Mission for the 21st Century Church (Peabody: Hendrickson Press, 2003), Section III on Messianic Spirituality.
Jones, Tony, Soul Shaper: Exploring Spirituality and Contemplative Practices in Youth Ministry (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2003).
Willard, Dallas, The Divine Conspiracy (San Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco, 1998).
Frost, Michael, Exiles: Living Missionally in a Post-Christian Empire (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 2006).

M7396 – Community Development

What does it mean for the people of God in the world to partner with God and others in the developing of His world for and towards His Kingdom? This unit seeks to expand our understanding of what God is doing in our world and how we can partner with him and others. All this is grounded in a methodology of community development that allows us to value those whom we are working with as co-labourers. We will also explore practical tools for this kind of engagement. At the end of the unit students will be able to articulate a clear theology for community development, be able to work towards employing an empowering methodology and have some practical on the ground skills for effective community engagement.

By the successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

· Discern and describe a theology of the Kingdom of God that is congruent with community development.

· Articulate an ecclesiology which allows the Church to engage meaningfully with its community and broader society

· Articulate an understanding of the Western context, issues of the developing world and the environment into which we are offering a community development response

· Discern and develop a methodology for community transformation that reflects Asset based Community Development (ABCD), rights based approaches and the importance of relationships

· Demonstrate an understanding and ability to engage in the project development cycle including research, design, implementation and evaluation

C7249 – Chaplain as Coach
Chaplains find themselves in many conversations where people just want to be listened to. What is the chaplain’s role here? To listen only? What skills are needed to make such conversations brilliant for both the chaplain and person? ‘Chaplain as Coach’ aims to develop these and other skills in chaplains so that these conversations are energising, inspiring and life changing.

At the end of this units students will be able to:
1. demonstrate a sound knowledge of the stages of the life cycle as described by a number of developmental theorists
2. identify the developmental nature of faith and moral reasoning
3. critique contemporary gender issues
4. address developmental concerns within pastoral care and counselling
5. demonstrate increased self-awareness of developmental issues within their own lives

The threshold concept to be acquired in this unit is to analyse ‘the self’ as both an obstacle and facilitator in the process of pastoral care and counselling.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Life cycle theorists, eg Freud, Erikson, Jung, Bronfenbrenner
2. Moral & faith development: Piaget, Kohlberg, Fowler
3. Developmental tasks: e.g. early attachments, identity, sexuality, career, marriage & family, mid-life changes, ageing
4. Issues pertaining to gender studies
5. The life cycle and pastoral counselling

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Human Development & Pastoral Counselling

C7369 – The Art and Science of Chaplaincy
This unit aims to equip the student to face the unique dilemmas, challenges and opportunities faced by chaplains in a wide variety of situations.

By the successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:
1. Show critical appreciation for the roles of self-differentiation, self-awareness and spirituality in effective people helping.
2. Appreciate the vital nature of working in team with others (chaplains, case workers, clinicians, managers, administrators and volunteers) in being a healthy and effective people helper.
3. Develop their own plans for professional development as key to their ongoing health, effectiveness and resilience as a chaplain.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Foundational skills of the chaplain
2. Self-awareness
3. Self-differentiation
4. Transdisciplinary relationships
5. Chaplaincy in a variety of contexts
7. Professional standards

C7395 – Understanding and Working with Grief and Trauma
This unit aims to equip the student to face the unique dilemmas, challenges and opportunities faced by chaplains and pastoral carers in a wide variety of situations.

By the successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:
1. Display perceptive understanding of the causes and effects of trauma
2. Demonstrate knowledge of different theoretical approaches to helping those dealing with a traumatic experience
3. Outline in broad terms how to approach grief, loss, and trauma in pastoral care
4. Articulate a variety of approaches to grief and trauma counseling
5. Identify appropriate and inappropriate forms of people helping with those experiencing grief, loss, and trauma
6. Understand best practice in self-care in relation to post-traumatic trauma and secondary post-traumatic trauma (compassion fatigue)
7. Show a critical appreciation of the ethical consideration of safety for the traumatised or grieving person

The content of this subject includes:
1. Introduction to trauma
2. Trauma and its effects on people
3. Unsafe people and their effect in creating trauma
4. Sexual abuse and trauma
5. Introduction to grief and loss
6. Post-traumatic stress
7. Compassion fatigue (secondary post-traumatic stress) in people helpers

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Pastoral Counselling: Grief, Loss and Trauma

P7102 – Issues and Ethics in Professional Practice
This unit aims to examine the critical ethical, legal and professional issues faced by chaplains, pastors and counsellors in a wide variety of ministry contexts.

By the successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:
1. Demonstrate thorough knowledge of the principles involved in making ethical decisions.
2. Display perceptive understanding of ethical dilemmas in chaplaincy practice.
3. Appreciate how the compliance frameworks in aged care, schools, defense force, police, and emergency services challenge pastoral carers to become effective professional chaplains.
4. Show a critical appreciation of the importance of how an ethical and legal understanding (particularly as it relates to privacy, confidentiality, reporting, and advocacy) enhances effective professional and pastoral practice.
5. Formulate a personal and professional stance on ethics in people helping

The content of this course includes:
1. Principles of ethics
2. The cost of caring
3. Confidentiality, trust and informed consent
4. Multiple relationships
5. Ethical decision-making – discernment
6. Ethical governance
7. Boundaries and boundary violations
8. Duty of care and manadatory reporting
9. Social issues

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Introduction to Ethical Ministry Practice

P7101 – Introduction to Pastoral Care

This course unit is an introduction to practical theology for ministry. It is also an opportunity to overview the biblical and theological foundations of ministry. Common aspects of ministry will be considered.

At the end of the unit students will be able to:
1) demonstrate a sound knowledge of key issues relating to the practice of pastoral care
2) display a sound understanding of the role of the human sciences in pastoral theology and ministry
3) apply the critical insights of biblical and theological foundations to the practice of ministry
4) demonstrate the process of reflection in the practice of ministry
5) develop and apply effective skills for pastoral ministry

The threshold concept to be acquired in this unit is the interdisciplinary nature of pastoral theology.

The content of this subject includes:
1. The theological, epistemological and biblical foundations of pastoral theology
2. Aspects of church pastoral and caring ministry
3. Human science perspectives on contemporary pastoral issues
4. Basic listening skills
5. Developing reflective practice in pastoral ministry
6. Methods of ministry and the place of ordination / leadership

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Introduction to Pastoral Theology and Ministry

P7111 – Foundations for Youth Ministry

This course unit is an introduction to the practice of youth ministry. It seeks to encourage students to think differently about how to best minister to this post-modern generation. Students will be introduced to ideas and principles applicable to many different contexts and tools to evaluate and implement these principles.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1) Identify the nature and strategic task of youth ministry within the church.
2) Understand the relevance of the various philosophies and principals of youth ministry to the ministry of the local church.
3) Explain the theory and practice behind the various models for youth ministry & how to apply them to a local setting.
4) Understand the process for analysing the current context of a group with a view to setting and communicating vision and goals for the ministry in order to move forward.
5) Apply new ideas to effectively reach and minister to the youth of the 21st century.

The content of this subject includes:
1) Biblical foundations
2) Defining Youth Ministry
3) Clarifying a Call to Ministry
4) Philosophy of Youth Ministry
5) Models for Youth Ministry
6) Getting started – Strategic Programming
7) The Principles of Programming
8) Prayer as a Foundation for Youth Ministry
9) Setting Vision and Goals for Youth Ministry
10) Schools Ministry

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Introduction to Youth Ministry

P7195*- Disciplemaking Movements 1: Foundations for Disciplemaking Movements

It is the conviction of this course that in the life of Jesus we not only see the means of salvation, but in Jesus God gave us the very model for the Christian life and mission in the world. Jesus- fully God and fully Human is the great mystery of the incarnation. In his lived humanity he demonstrated the perfect model of a life lived in full obedience to the Father’s kingdom agenda in the world and fully dependant on the indwelling power of the Holy Spirit. Jesus did not simply live his life focused on the cross, but in his life he set in motion the Spirit-empowered movement that would carry the gospel of the kingdom into all ‘Judea, Samaria and to the ends of the World’ (Acts 1:8). Jesus gathered around him a group of followers whom he selected, invested himself in, trained, equipped and sent to continue the movement that he had begun. These first disciples were instructed to go into all the world, in the authority of Jesus, filled with the Holy Spirit, to ‘make disciples of all nations, baptising them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit and teaching them to obey everything’ he had commanded (Matt 28:19f). As the Father had sent Jesus, so he sent his followers and this process continues wherever the Gospel of the kingdom is proclaimed. The Church, at its heart, is to embody the continuing mission of Jesus- a disciple-making movement that sees the world as its mission field.

All too often the church has been distracted from this core mission of making disciples and in our contemporary climate it is no different. People seek for the latest model that will make their church, mission or ministry grow and be effective. We desire instant results and quick fixes to our struggling programs. Ultimately though, Jesus’ movement of Disciple-Making is not a quick fix, or an instant result, but it is our model for the church. It is in his life, teaching, mission and ministry that we see what we are to be like and on what we are to focus.

This course builds the foundations for developing a disciplemaking framework drawn from the life of Jesus. It will help students form a missional hermeneutic for engaging with the Gospels and Acts. Students will draw core principles from the unfolding process of Jesus’ disciple-making and apply them in their own context.

This unit is part of the SHIFTm2M process, a year-long learning experience which explores the practicality of seeing Jesus’ mission through his priority of building a disciple-making movement. Students engaging in this unit must be, or have been, participating in the SHIFTm2M process.

Much of the content provided in this course is originally created by SonLife Classic USA, and is authorised for use in Australia through Campus Crusade for Christ Australia under the name ‘SHIFTm2M’.

1. The need for a biblical Disciplemaking philosophy

2. Imitatio Christi- Christ as our model for life and ministry.

3. Establishing a Christocentric model for Disciplemaking

4. Ministry preparation and understanding the mission of Jesus and the Church in the world.

5. Ministry Preparation and developing a disciplemaking framework.

6. Understanding and developing the purpose, passion, product and process for disciplemaking.

7. Establishing foundational priorities for disciplemaking environments.

8. Equipping believers for participating in disciplemaking

9. Transforming from ministry to a philosophy of movements

*Please note: This unit is only available to students who are part of the SHIFTm2M cohort.
For further information about joining a cohort, please contact the National Office.

P7210 – Children’s Ministry

This course seeks to address the value of children and ministry to them within the wholistic context of the family and the faith community, believing that scripture teaches us that this is the best model of helping a child’s faith formation develop in a solid and strong way. We long to see children grow and develop a lifelong faith that helps them become the adults God intended them to be.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

1) Explain the basic concepts of Children’s ministry as a missional activity of the local Church
2) Explain the basic features of the learning characteristics, overall development and appropriate stages of faith of children.
3) Discover and use contemporary resources and techniques to nurture, manage, and ensure safety in children’s ministry in congregational and community settings
4) Demonstrate broad familiarity with a variety of Children‘s ministry approaches in congregational and community settings
5) Implement children’s ministry programs where children are full participants in their faith communities and where children‘s spiritual and religious formation is nurtured in their homes and their Church

CONTENT
1) Biblical and theological perspectives on the faith formation of a child.
2) Intergenerational Christian formation practices
3) Developing the family-at-the-centre approach to faith formation.
4) Children’s ministry in the way of Jesus.
5) The Church’s role in helping to raise spiritual champions.
6) A study of the learning characteristics and overall development of children.
7) Discipling Children at appropriate faith stages
8) Mission with children in communities of faith and in the world.
9) Behaviour management and safe Environments for working with children.
10) Effective Communication and techniques to nurture and engage children in the faith community.

P7211 – Developing a Youth Ministry

This course unit provides students with strategies for establishing a culture of discipleship and leadership development within the youth group. The unit guides them in the practice of recruiting and training youth leaders as well as building student leaders.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1) Understand the key principles and strategies for making disciples in youth ministry.
2) Identify the key components for faith development & discipleship in youth.
3) Understand the importance of developing a relational approach to youth ministry.
4) Explain the context of programs in the discipleship and mentoring of young people and leaders.
5) Apply various models for equipping youth for leadership and ministry

The content of this subject includes:
1) Foundations for Making Disciples
2) Unleashing Potential in Youth
3) Relational Youth Ministry
4) Small Groups, Follow-up and Nurture
5) Equipping Youth for Ministry
6) Equipping Youth for Ministry – Techniques
7) Equipping Youth for Mission
8) Equipping Youth for Leadership
9) Mentoring Youth to Spiritual Maturity
10) Youth Ministry Development
11) Camps, Retreats and Mission Trips well done
12) Developing a Culture of Evangelism

P7261 – Principles of Pastoral Leadership

This course unit assists those preparing for or engaged in leadership roles in ministry. It involves practical application of what is learnt in other course units and directs learning to the service of others in their faith journey

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1) demonstrate an understanding of the biblical, traditional, theological and personal foundations of Christian leadership
2) engage with a personal understanding of pastoral leadership
3) examine one’s own strengths and areas requiring growth and development
4) identify the relationship between the spiritual leader and those served by leadership, within cultural and institutional contexts
5) summarise the various models of pastoral leadership with particular reference to team leadership and develop a working model for their own faith community

The content for this subject includes:
1) Christian leadership in its biblical, traditional and theological expressions
2) Qualities, knowledge and skills necessary for pastoral leadership
3) Needs and expectations of those seeking pastoral leadership
4) Leaders and leadership teams within the context of contemporary Christian community
5) The influence of culture and society on leadership

P7274 – Team Ministry Skills

This course unit builds upon previous theoretical and applied reflections in previous units to assist in the development of leadership skills and will provide practical skills for increasing organisational effectiveness.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1) demonstrate an understanding of the nature and breadth of team leadership skills
2) exhibit an ability to relate various theories and skills to organisations
3) show an appreciation of the necessity of developing teams and applying leadership skills in organisations, and of enlarging the capacity and character of team members
4) display an understanding of personality differences and the ways in which these affect team relationships
5) show an appreciation of the overall impact a harmonious team in a larger church can have towards effective mission

The content of this subject includes:
1) The nature and importance of team building
2) The Myers-Briggs and other models which explain personality differences
3) Methods of teambuilding
4) Developing effective team communication skills
5) Priority setting and delegation
6) Supervising and appraising performance
7) Conflict management
8) Leading organisations through change

M7295 – Becoming a Missional Leader

This course unit examines the nature and practice of leadership, which has personal and organisational transformation as its primary object. Participants will be challenged to develop a biblical model of leadership based on Jesus’ ministry, and to develop an intentional strategy for their own ongoing spiritual and personal nourishment.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1) Categorise personal leadership styles in the light of biblical, historical and business models
2) Differentiate models of transformational leadership
3) Explain the link between personal renewal and corporate revitalisation
4) Prescribe the appropriate transformational intervention for an organisation according to its organisational lifecycle stage
5) Outline an intentional strategy, grounded in careful research, for personal spiritual growth and corporate renewal

The content of this subject includes:
1) The traits, functions and styles of a leader
2) Character and ministry formation of a leader
3) Transformational and transactional leadership
4) Biblical models of transformational leadership
5) Transformational leadership and the lifecycles of movements
6) The gospel as a life-giving reality and ministry as a life-giving activity

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: The Transformational Leader

P7326 – Culture and Context of Youth Ministry

This course unit seeks to enable students to understand young people and the Australian culture, while equipping them to provide care to youth and their families. It provides an in-depth review of the research on the current generation of youth in their cultural context and on the deep issues that affect young people.

At the end of this unit students will be able to: :
1) Gain a understanding of cultural formation and how culture shapes identity, values and behaviours
2) Understand the different facets of culture, individualistic and collectivist cultures and subcultures
3) Have a greater awareness of the importance of gospel culture and how it can be paralleled to youth culture today in its presentation
4) Assess priorities and strategies for caring for young people and their families.
5) Be able to apply the aspects of culture to their youth ministry to gain a greater perspective on how to minister to youth.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Youth in Context
2. The Gospel & Youth
3. Strategies & Models for Counselling
4. Basic Skills for Counselling Youth
5. Caring for Young People
6. Intervention for Youth In Crisis & Hazards & Limitations in Counselling
7. Youth Development
8. Culture & Youth
9. Cultural Formation
10. Cultural Needs
11. Youth Issues – External
12. Youth Issues – Internal

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Culture and Context for Youth Ministry

P7327 – Youth Ministry and Personal Growth

This course unit enables the student to appreciate balanced ministry, by establishing healthy ministry patterns to combat unrealistic expectations and burnout in youth ministry. The unit guides students to develop the necessary professional and personal tools for sustaining ministry to youth.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1) Know how to establish healthy ministry patterns to combat unrealistic expectations and burnout in Youth Ministry.
2) Have an understanding of the tools necessary to develop initiative and personal management skills.
3) Articulate the factors contributing to the changing face of youth culture and society and how this impacts the local Church
4) Articulate the issues around caring for, resourcing and developing serves ass.
5) Apply balanced life principles to assist ministry and personal growth.

The content of this subject includes:
1) Longevity in Youth Ministry
2) Managing Self
3) Managing Time
4) Managing Change
5) Managing Diversity
6) Dealing with Conflict and criticism
7) Team Ministry – Building a Leadership Team
8) Youth Ministry and Christian Spirituality
9) Effective Team Leadership
10) Preventing Stress & Burnout
11) Budgeting, Fundraising & Financial Management
12) Responsible Practices for Youth Leadership

P7364 – Mastering Change

This course unit acknowledges that students live their lives in times of change, and perform their ministries as agents of change for the sake of the gospel. It seeks to equip students to understand the dynamics of change in history, in institutions, and in their private lives. This unit seeks to equip students to understand change positively, and to master it as a tool for Christian ministry.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1) Construct a model of how change is given effect from biblical and theological foundations
2) Critique alternative theories of how change-movements are conceived, implemented and managed
3) Organise change as a positive feature in their own leadership
4) Facilitate change within their own circles of influence and assist others to embrace and grow through change
5) Explain their own critical appreciation of personal and organisational change as an opportunity for growth and service

The content of this subject includes:
1) Introduction to change: metaphors and morphologies
2) ‘Mastering’ change: case studies from the biblical texts
3) Dealing with change: ‘clock builders’ versus ‘time tellers’
4) Change, time and movement: spiritual and emotional issues
5) Mastering change at an organisational level
6) Designing and implementing organisational change: projects and case studies

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Mastering Change in Ministry

P7282 – Supervised Ministry 1
There are 2 Supervised Ministry Units, of 9 credit points each. It is expected that students will enrol in both units. Students should enrol in both at the start of the year, and will receive access to the unit information in trimester 1. However, they will technically be enrolled in Supervised Ministry 1 in trimester 2, and Supervised Ministry 2 in trimester 3. Students will be expected to work on the units throughout the year.

This course unit incorporates learning experiences at a practical level as well as giving opportunity to reflect on both the practice and theory of ministry. This reflection occurs with both an appointed supervisor and mentor as well as the formal classroom situation. The mentoring would be with experienced ordained pastors or those in recognised specialist ministries.

At the end of the unit students should be able to:
1) identify important aspects of support for ministry settings
2) demonstrate a critical understanding of the issues involved in interacting within the mentoring and classroom situation
3) incorporate the supervisory process and personal journaling as a means of critical self-evaluation
4) demonstrate a sound level of practical involvement and initiative in the process of practical church ministry
5) appreciate the value and process of being mentored as means of personal growth

The content of this subject includes:
Ministry placement
2) Involvement in the process of mentoring and theological reflection with an appointed supervisor
3) Seminars and group interaction
4) The theory and the practice of pastoral ministry
5) Develop an initial personal ministry profile
6)Legalities of pastoral ministry (e.g. Regulation check lists for children‘s workers)

P7382 – Supervised Ministry 2
There are 2 Supervised Ministry Units, of 9 credit points each. It is expected that students will enrol in both units. Students should enrol in both at the start of the year, and will receive access to the unit information in trimester 1. However, they will technically be enrolled in Supervised Ministry 1 in trimester 2, and Supervised Ministry 2 in trimester 3. Students will be expected to work on the units throughout the year.

This course unit enables the student to work in a supervised ministry context for an extended period of time gaining valuable practical ministry experience within an existing ministry team. The process of reflection on practice is developed through personal and theological reflection. The unit expands and develops the supervised ministry one experience of the student. The student will work with both an appointed supervisor and mentor for the duration of this placement.

At the end of the unit students should be able to:
1) Demonstrate an ability to exercise public ministry with evidence of leadership within a supervised context
2) Outline the process for integrating theological understanding and practice
3) Discuss the dynamics of team ministry
4) Analyse both church / ministry setting and personal decision making processes
5) Appreciate the value of personal and peer reflection

The content of this subject includes:
Substantial ministry placement
2) Critical involvement in the process of mentoring and theological reflection with an appointed supervisor
3) Seminars and group interaction
4) The theory and the practice of pastoral ministry
5) Identity an initial personal ministry profile
6)Legalities of pastoral ministry (e.g. Regulation check lists for children‘s workers)

X7393 – Independent Guided Study (9 credit point)
This course unit enables students with initiative and creativity to pursue ideas and areas of interest in a subject area. It affords the student an opportunity to develop independent research and study skills.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. identify a question to be posed or a topic to be investigated in the particular subject area,
2. describe a suitable method for resolving the question or for researching the topic,
3. outline a working bibliography for the area of their research,
4. show an informed competence in descriptive, critical and analytic skills with respect to the topic of their research,
5. produce a report (or reports) that is clearly expressed and well argued.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Process for choosing topic of interest.
2. Process for determining selection of necessary research skills.
3. Process for selection of sources of information that assist and guide the development of necessary research skills.
4. Process for obtaining approval by the appropriate academic authority in the MI to proceed with the unit.

X7394 – Independent Guided Study (18 credit point)

This course unit enables students with initiative and creativity to pursue ideas and areas of interest in a subject area. It affords the student an opportunity to develop independent research and study skills.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. identify for themselves a question to be posed or a topic to be investigated in the particular subject area,
2. describe a satisfactory method for resolving the question or for researching the topic,
3. outline a working bibliography for the area of their research,
4. show an informed competence in descriptive, critical and analytic skills with respect to the topic of their research,
5. produce a report (or reports) that is clearly expressed and well argued

The content of this subject includes:
1. Process for choosing topic of interest.
2. Process for determining selection of necessary research skills.
3. Process for selection of sources of information that assist and guide the development of necessary research skills.
4. Process for obtaining approval by the appropriate academic authority in the MI to proceed with the unit.

X7399 – Capstone Unit

This capstone course unit provides an opportunity for students to integrate what they have previously learned in the major area of study, in other course units that formed part of the degree, and in their life experiences beyond the formal course of study. It enables students to demonstrate a broad mastery of learning across the curriculum, to consider its application in future life situations, and to plan further learning experiences designed to complement and extend their current levels of understanding. It normally introduces little new content although it may introduce new methodologies and techniques.

A capstone unit may develop in many ways. It has the potential for various learning outcomes. The learning outcomes below are examples of typical learning outcomes.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. interrogate the disciplinary assumptions and intellectual history of their major area of study
2. reflect upon and articulate their personal reasons for studying and practising their particular area of theology and ministry
3. consider their personal experiences in studying theology and ministry in a broader social and critical context with a view to their future life experiences
4. engage in debate about the significance of theology to public discourse, and the relative merits of a formal education in studies in theology and ministry
5. construct an original argument in relation to a field of scholarly debate
6. support arguments with textual evidence using appropriate the critical skills
7. conduct formal textual analysis of works within their major area of study.
8. consolidate higher-level applied communication skills (written, oral, interpersonal, professional presentations)
9. apply theory to practice, work effectively in employment-related teamwork situations, and effectively use professional networking opportunities
10. demonstrate of early professional dispositions and ethical stance.

The class sessions include scaffolding students through the synthesis of their prior knowledge. They provide students with frameworks for planning, reflection, analysis, and synthesis. Sessions might include
• development of realistic and feasible topics.
• advice on the types of projects that could be undertaken and opportunities to discuss projects
• guidance on development of plans for achieving outcomes and on completing projects or reports
• assistance with working effectively and collaborating in a team,
• risk management associated with students’ participation in authentic professional and industry settings.

X7391 – Research Project (9 credit point)
This course unit builds on the theological background, capacity and interests of a student and enables her or him to pursue broad research, often of a survey nature, into an area or topic within a discipline or across disciplines. This research cannot usually be done within the strictures of individual coursework units or the focused study of a particular topic.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. demonstrate broad knowledge of the area chosen within the disciplines being studied
2. demonstrate undergraduate level skills of researching within a discipline and across disciplines where applicable
3. critically evaluate the topic under consideration using the methodologies of the subject area/s
4. integrate the topic being studied into a wider theological framework
5. evaluate the pertinent theological, ministerial and social implications of the topic

Advanced students must learn to study special-interest topics independently according to a valid method of research and analysis.

This course unit permits students to research a topic of their own choosing in consultation with the lecturer.

X7392 – Research Project (18 credit point)
This course unit builds on the theological background, capacity and interests of a student and enables her or him to pursue broad research, often of a survey nature, into an area or topic within a discipline or across disciplines,. This research cannot usually be done within the strictures of individual coursework units or the focused study of a particular topic.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. demonstrate broad knowledge of the area chosen within the disciplines being studied
2. demonstrate undergraduate level skills of researching within a discipline and across disciplines where applicable
3. critically evaluate the topic under consideration using the methodologies of the subject area/s
4. integrate the topic being studied into a wider theological framework
5. evaluate the pertinent theological, ministerial and social implications of the topic

Advanced students must learn to study special-interest topics independently according to a valid method of research and analysis.

This course unit permits students to research a topic of their own choosing in consultation with the lecturer.

X7398 – Action Research Project (18 credit point)
This course unit enables the student to develop competency in a research approach that enhances their ability to reflect, act and learn in their ministry/work context

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1) Plan an action research project that integrates established theory, professional practice, and personal development
2) Review current literature within the fields of the research project
3) Actively engage in a work/ministry-based context and apply established theories to the action being observed
4) Reflect on and plan for continuous improvement within the framework of best practice action research (multiple cycles of planning, acting, observing and reflecting)
5) Establish the research findings as reliable and trustworthy in accordance with best practice action research

The content of this subject includes:
1) Introducing the action research approach
2) Engaging stakeholders as co-researchers
3) Researching action
4) Integration of theory and practice
5) Recording and analysing the three unique contributions: development of self, development of organisation, and contribution to the body of knowledge

GRADUATE LEVEL (AQF 8-9)

B8520 – Introduction to the Old Testament

This course unit aims to introduce students to the literary forms, historical and cultural contexts and theological themes of the Old Testament. It seeks to provide a foundation for further biblical and theological study.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. demonstrate a general understanding of the overall structure and contents of the Old Testament
2. identify the literary shape, themes, social and historical background of the individual books of the Old Testament
3. employ critical methodologies in the interpretation of Old Testament texts.
4. access secondary literature
5. convey the relevance of the Old Testament to Christian life and the contemporary world

A threshold concept to be acquired in this unit is:
The books of the Old Testament are works of literature, written and received in a particular historical period, for a distinct religious purpose.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Introduction to the Canon
2. Introductory questions of each book of the Old Testament (authorship, date, historical, political and cultural contexts, etc.)
3. Structure and outline of the major books of the Old Testament
4. Literary genres of Old Testament literature
5. Key theological themes of the Old Testament collection
6. Critical approaches to Old Testament interpretation

B8530 – Introduction to the New Testament

This course unit introduces students to the critical study of the New Testament, its literary forms, historical and cultural contexts and theological themes. It provides a solid foundation for further biblical and theological study.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. articulate a thorough knowledge of the contents of the New Testament
2. assess the historical, social and cultural context of the New Testament
3. demonstrate well-developed exegetical skills in critical interpretation of New Testament texts
4. integrate significant secondary literature into formal critical essays on the books of the New Testament
5. relate the fruits of New Testament studies to a range of life and ministry situations.

A threshold concept to be acquired in this unit is:
The books of the New Testament are works of literature, written and received in a particular historical period, for a distinct religious purpose.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Contents of the New Testament
2. Historical, cultural, political and religious contexts of the New Testament materials
3. The literary nature of the New Testament
4. Key methodologies and approaches to Biblical interpretation and critical issues
5. Developing skills in exegesis and writing an exegetical essay
6. Identification and analysis of key New Testament themes

B8596 – The Four Gospels

This Course Unit builds on the Biblical Studies introductory units by investigating the principal literary, historical and theological features of the four Gospels through exegetical methodologies.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. demonstrate knowledge of the historical, socio-cultural and religious background of the four Gospels
2. identify the main literary forms and theological themes of the four Gospels
3. employ exegetical methodologies in formal essay style on selected passages from the Gospels
4. access and use sound secondary scholarship on the Gospels
5. integrate their acquired knowledge into preaching, liturgy and spiritual leadership

The content of this subject includes:
1. Placing Jesus in his historical, cultural, and religious context.
2. Contemporary historical-critical methodologies for studying the Gospels.
3. The Quest for the Historical Jesus.
4. The principal literary features and themes of each Gospel.
5. Practical exercise in exegesis of a selection from one Gospel.
6. Application of critically researched knowledge of the Gospels to various ministry contexts

B8597 – Prophetic Literature

This course unit builds on the knowledge and skills developed in Intro to the Old Testament. It examines the literary forms and theological content of Israel’s prophetic books, with due consideration of their historical, cultural and religious settings/contexts. In particular, it seeks to recognise the unique character of the prophetic literature of the Bible and the theological consequences of the different character of these writings.

By the successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of the critical issues associated with the study of prophetic literature
2. Show how various prophetic literary forms communicate their theological content
3. Exegete selected passages from prophetic books
4. Utilise the relevant secondary literature in a critical manner
5. Apply insights of prophetic literature to various aspects of teaching, ministry, and spirituality

Content
1. Developing an appropriate context for the study of prophetic literature
2. Study of prophetic literary forms and their content/themes
3. Exegesis of selected texts from prophetic books
4. Aspects of the theology of prophetic books

B9603 – Hermeneutics

This course unit aims to introduce students to the history, goals and general principles of biblical interpretation with attention paid to the recognition and interpretation of the various literary genres in the Bible.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. demonstrate an advanced knowledge of principles for the interpretation of the Bible
2. evaluate a broad range of scholarly approaches used in interpreting Scripture
3. apply pertinent interpretation principles to biblical texts
4. recognize the various literary genre used in the Bible and interpret the texts according to the specific requirements of each genre
5. appreciate the value of a diverse range of approaches used in the interpretation of the Scriptures within the Christian tradition

Human authors under the guidance of the Holy Spirit composed the Bible in order to communicate God’s word of revelation to human readers. It therefore should be interpreted according to normal rules of literary interpretation.

The content of this subject includes:
1. The need for a principled approach to biblical interpretation.
2. Terms of reference used in biblical interpretation.
3. The history of biblical interpretation.
4. Key issues in biblical interpretation.
5. General principles of biblical interpretation.
6. The application of interpretation principles to specific genres of biblical literature.
7. The application of interpretation principles to life and ministry issues.

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Interpretation of the Bible

B9610 – Studies in the Pentateuch

This course unit builds on the basic knowledge and skills of the foundational Biblical Studies unit, focusing in particular on the books of Genesis and Exodus, with special attention to their literary forms, theological content and historical, cultural and religious setting.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the biblical books that deal with Israel’s formative period.
2. show an awareness of recent secondary literature resources that discuss the books of Genesis and Exodus
3. exhibit a perceptive understanding of the importance of the books of Genesis and Exodus for Old Testament faith and Israelite identity
4. demonstrate well-developed skills in the exegesis of selected Old Testament texts
5. show a critical appreciation of Genesis and Exodus as expressions of Israel‘s faith in God’s action in history and of their application to Christian life and worship in the present era.

The books of Genesis and Exodus discuss the key historical and theological factors that contributed to the formation of the ancient nation of Israel and that serve as the basis for religious and theological concepts that continue to be developed throughout the entire Canon of Scripture.

The content of this subject includes:
1. The historical, geographical, cultural, religious and political context of Israel’s formative period as represented in the narratives of Genesis and Exodus.
2. Characteristic literary forms and content of Genesis and Exodus
3. Exegesis of selected passages in the books of Genesis and Exodus
4. Aspects of the theology of Genesis and Exodus

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Israel’s Beginnings: the books of Genesis and Exodus

B9629 – Wisdom and Poetry in Israel

This unit considers together material from a wide range of genres. These range from hymns, thanksgivings, and laments/complaints among the liturgical poetry of Psalms to the erotic love songs of the Song of Songs. In between we will also examine a range of writings broadly classed as “Wisdom” literature, though their forms, expression, and advice about living are perhaps more strikingly different from each other than they are similar.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

1. explain the structures, literary forms and contents of the selected books and passages of the Old Testament
2. critically evaluate principal forms and patterns of biblical poetry
3. specify and appraise significant themes in the selected works
4. determine the appropriate methodology in analysing and exegeting selected texts
5. apply the relevance of the Wisdom literature to the contemporary church and society

CONTENT
Origins and characteristics of the Wisdom literature
Techniques and patterns of Hebrew poetry
Structure and contents of books and passages selected from Job, Qoheleth, Proverbs, Sirach, Wisdom of Solomon, Song of Songs, Lamentations, the Psalms, and other poetry in the Old Testament
Pertinent historical, social, religious, and cultural background
Exegetical study of selected texts
Major theological themes emerging from these books

B9657 – Lukan Literature

The New Testament books of Luke and Acts capture the ministry of Jesus and the development of the early Church. Some of the most familiar stories of the whole Bible, such as the Good Samaritan, are found only in Luke or Acts. This unit of study will provide an overview of the text of each of these books. Themes common to both books will also be explored. Students will be given tools that help them engage with the text in a holistic manner.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

1. account at an advanced level for the complex historical, religious and social background of Luke-Acts

2. explain the various literary forms used in the construction of Luke-Acts

3. interpret the theological themes of Luke-Acts

4. exegete select passages from the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles using appropriate methodologies

5. construct liturgies, homilies or biblical discussion group materials on Luke-Acts

Content:
· Introduction to Lukan Literature
· The Early Ministry of Jesus
· Jesus heads to Jerusalem
· The Church Starts
· Peter and Paul spread the news
· The Gospel gets to Rome
· God at Work, and other themes
· Women in Luke-Acts, and other themes
· The use of Scripture in Luke-Acts, and other themes.
· Application of Luke-Acts to ministry

B9672 – Pauline Literature

This course unit enables students to extend their critical abilities in Biblical research by studying in close detail one of the major texts of the New Testament. It enables student in AQF Level 7 Bachelor programs to complete a Biblical Studies major and students in AQF level 9 programs to advance beyond foundational Biblical Studies.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Critically account for the historical, socio-cultural and religious background of the Roman Christian communities.
2. Appraise the principal theological arguments of Romans.
3. Critically exegete selected passages from Romans
4. Integrate into formal essay writing, critical scholarship on Romans.
5. Employ their acquired knowledge in preaching, liturgy and spiritual and pastoral leadership.

Threshold concepts to be acquired in this unit are:
1. The relationship of Paul, the apostle to the Gentiles, to the Christian communities in Rome.
2. The relationship of the letter to the Romans to Paul’s previous and projected further apostolic work.
3. The principal theological concepts of Romans, especially justification, faith, law and reconciliation.

The content of this subject includes:
1. The historical, geographical and socio-cultural context of the mid-1st century CE Roman Christian communities.
2. The apostolic career and writings of Paul the Apostle previous to the writing of Romans.
3. The literary genre of the ancient letter and relevant rhetorical strategies of the time.
4. The distinctive theological themes of Romans.
5. Contemporary historical-critical methodologies for studying Romans.
6. Research and essay writing skills for Romans.
7. Application of critically researched knowledge of Romans to various Church activities.

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Romans

 

T8501 – Introduction to Theology
This graduate course unit introduces students to the nature and tasks of theology and to theological method. It provides a foundation for all future theology course units.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Demonstrate a developed understanding of the nature and purpose of theology
2. Identify and explain the doctrinal presuppositions that are the foundation for theology
3. Critically analyse the writing of several theological thinkers and key theological texts, ancient and modern
4. Determine an appropriate methodology for particular theological tasks
5. Apply the skills of theological reflection to life in the community of faith

The threshold concept to be acquired in this unit is that theology is an engagement with the data of revelation, using reason and the entire conscience of the person as well as prayer.

The content of this subject includes:
1. The nature and purpose of theology
2. Overview of history of theology
3. Theological method
4. Presuppositions for doing theology
5. Context for theology
6. The vocation of the theologian

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Introducing Theology

T8517 – The Church
This unit is designed to introduce the student to the function, purpose, and mission of the church and to explore from a theological perspective why engaging in the church is not an optional extra for the Christian life but its very lifeblood.

Content
1. Becoming the People of God
2. Who’s in? Who’s out?
3. What is the Church?
4. The Church and the Kingdom of God
5. Christ – the Head of the Church
6. The Sacramental Function of the Church
7. Sacrament Case Study (1) – Communion
8. Sacrament Case Study (2) – Baptism
9. The Mission of the Church
10. The Future of the Church

T8531 – The Person and Work of Christ
This graduate course unit is designed to provide students with a foundational knowledge of the person and saving work of Jesus Christ. It also explores the relevance of this understanding in the light of contemporary Christian thought and discipleship.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Demonstrate a developed understanding of the person and work of Christ in the New Testament;
2. Develop critical awareness of the evolution of Christological and soteriological doctrine.
3. Comprehensively analyze source documents and theological literature relevant to Christology and Soteriology;
4. Critically and thoroughly explore issues in Christology and Soteriology in the context of contemporary culture and religion; and,
5. Creatively apply Christological and Soteriological insights to the Christian spiritual life and Christian discipleship.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Methodological issues and/or foundational concepts in Christology and Soteriology
2. Christological and Soteriological themes in the New Testament
3. The evolution of Christological and Soteriological doctrine
4. The development of the theological understanding of the person and saving work of Jesus Christ
5. Contemporary issues in Christology and Soteriology
6. Implications for Ecclesiology and the Christian Life

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Christology and Soteriology

T8534 – The Trinity
This graduate unit builds on the knowledge and skills learned in the introductory unit in theology. It prepares the student for more specialised study at higher levels through a study of the nature, attributes and creative work of the Triune God as this is made known to us through his self-revelation.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Demonstrate a sound knowledge of the literature and the major theological doctrines (Revelation, Trinity, God the Father, Creation, Providence) relevant to this unit
2. Demonstrate a critical awareness of the ways that the Church has understood the interaction between the self-revealing God and creation
3. Critically analyse a range of primary and secondary literature dealing with God’s self-revelation and his interaction with creation
4. Critically evaluate key issues arising from their study of God’s self-revelation in the light of our contemporary cultural and religious setting
5. Synthesise this knowledge and apply it to pastoral situations arising within their ministry setting

The content of this subject includes:
1. Prolegomena: theological methodology
2. The Self-Revealing God
3. The holy Trinity
4. The nature and attributes of God
5. God the Creator
6. God the Governor: providence and the problem of evil

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: The Triune God and Revelation

T8592 – Transformational Discipleship
This unit explores the significance of Jesus’ revolutionary Kingdom vision for understanding discipleship and spiritual formation. When Jesus came proclaiming the good news that the Kingdom is now available, His aim was not just to get people into heaven in the end – it is to get heaven into people from the start! Following Jesus involves developing an integrated practical theology of Kingdom participation that informs our whole of life interaction with God. Understanding more about Jesus’ incarnational and relational Way of transforming us profoundly affects how we then serve and lead others in our local and particular contexts.

CURRICULUM OBJECTIVES
This graduate unit explores theological approaches to spiritual formation and discipleship that are consistent with Jesus’ Kingdom vision and ministry. Following Jesus involves developing an integrated practical theology of apprenticeship into Kingdom living. Jesus’ relational and particular Way of transforming us profoundly affects how we then lead others.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

1) Explore theological approaches to discipleship and spiritual formation that are consistent with Jesus’ Kingdom vision and ministry.
2) Critically examine the importance of the Trinitarian nature of God for understanding Christian spiritual formation.
3) Evaluate how Jesus’ life and ministry enables authentic and substantive participation in God’s Kingdom.
4) Investigate an integrated practical theology of discipleship.
5) Formulate how apprenticeship into Kingdom living transforms our leadership.

CONTENT
6. Theological approaches to discipleship and spiritual formation based on the life of Jesus.

7. The Trinitarian nature of God as the foundation for Christian spiritual formation.

8. The significance of Jesus’ life and ministry for authentic and substantive participation in God’s Kingdom.

9. Integrating a practical theology of discipleship.

10. How Kingdom living transforms our leadership.

T8595 – Theology for Ministry
This course unit enables students to explore what it means to minister in the Church in the modern world. It will assist them to reflect on the foundations for their own practise of ministry.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. demonstrate a well developed understanding of the relationship between ministry and the mission of the Church
2. research and analyse the history and present shape of ministry in the Church
3. articulate a theology of church and ministry that takes account of the ecumenical consensus and of their particular ecclesial context
4. develop a response to contemporary challenges
5. apply the theology of ministry in a collaborative ecclesial context

The content of this subject includes:
1. Ministry in Scripture and in the first Christian communities
2. The ministry of the church as the whole people of God
3. Theologies of ordination
4. The relationship between lay and ordained ministry
5. Ministry and leadership in ecclesial communities
6. An ecumenical perspective on ministry in the Church

T9695 – Biblical Answers for Life’s Questions
This course unit introduces students to the foundations of Christian ethics from the biblical sources. It identifies critical issues for Christian ministry in an amoral culture, providing students with a framework for theological reflection and a platform upon which to base their missional and pastoral ministries.

By the successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

1. Demonstrate a critical awareness of the foundations of Christian ethics from the biblical sources.
2. Identify a range of Christian and non-Christian approaches to ethics.
3. Formulate a defence of Christian ethics in an amoral culture.
4. Incorporate a distinctly biblical “ethic” into the ministries.
5. Appreciate the Christian community as the harbinger of the values of the kingdom of God.
6. Value the importance of ethical behaviour as the link-point between faith and practice.

The content for this subject includes:
1. Greek Philosophy and Classical approaches to Ethics
2. Old Testament Ethical Foundations
3. New Testament Foundations: Jesus and the Gospels
4. New Testament Foundations: Paul and the early Church
5. Ethical Models and their Practical Outworking
6. Approaches to Ethical Decision-Making as a Christian: Models, Mandates, Missions
7. Just War: its Christian Roots and Contemporary Issues
8. Life Issues: Abortion and Euthanasia
9. Sexuality in a Pornographic World
10. Responding to the Oppressed of the World
11. A Theological Response to Consumerism
12. Towards a Biblically-Grounded Christian “Ethical Theology” for Christian Ministry Praxis

T9699 – Capstone Unit in Theology
This capstone course unit provides an opportunity for students to integrate what they have previously learned in the major area of study, in other course units that formed part of the degree, and in their life experiences beyond the formal course of study. It enables students to demonstrate a broad mastery of learning across the curriculum, to consider its application in future life situations, and to plan further learning experiences designed to complement and extend their current levels of understanding. It normally introduces little new content although it may introduce new methodologies and techniques.

A capstone unit may develop in many ways. It has the potential for various learning outcomes. The learning outcomes below are examples of typical learning outcomes.
At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. interrogate the disciplinary assumptions and intellectual history of their major area of study
2. reflect upon and articulate their personal reasons for studying and practising their particular area of theology and ministry
3. consider their personal experiences in studying theology and ministry in a broader social and critical context with a view to their future life experiences
4. engage in debate about the significance of theology to public discourse, and the relative merits of a formal education in studies in theology and ministry
5. construct an original argument in relation to a field of scholarly debate
6. support arguments with textual evidence using appropriate the critical skills
7. conduct formal textual analysis of works within their major area of study.
8. consolidate higher-level applied communication skills (written, oral, interpersonal, professional presentations)
9. apply theory to practice, work effectively in employment-related teamwork situations, and effectively use professional networking opportunities
10. demonstrate of early professional dispositions and ethical stance.

The class sessions include scaffolding students through the synthesis of their prior knowledge. They provide students with frameworks for planning, reflection, analysis, and synthesis. Sessions might include
1. development of realistic and feasible topics.
2. advice on the types of projects that could be undertaken and opportunities to discuss projects
3. guidance on development of plans for achieving outcomes and on completing projects or reports
4. assistance with working effectively and collaborating in a team,
5. risk management associated with students’ participation in authentic professional and industry settings.

H8501 – Introduction to Christian History
This course unit introduces the student to the discipline of church history and provides an overview of significant historical periods and themes and the variety of methodological approaches to them.

At the end of this unit students will be able to
1. Demonstrate solid knowledge of a number of key events in the Church’s past
2. Understand and articulate a number of approaches to researching, constructing and interpreting the past
3. Distinguish between primary and secondary source materials and use such sources critically and appropriately
4. Show with precision how historical knowledge provides a necessary context for theological studies
5. Construct and support a coherent and historical argument in written form that demonstrates capacity for critical thinking and analysis, and utilises the methodological conventions of the discipline.

Students need to be able to grasp the concept that history is not just a chronological description of events but involves an interpretive element and a range of methodological approaches.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Introducing the discipline of church history
2. Research tools for the study of church history
3. Methodologies in the study of church history
4. Introducing the work of influential historians
5. Overview of significant shaping events and periods in the history of Christianity
6. Case studies of historical periods utilising a number of methods.

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Introduction to the Study of Christian History

H8563 – The Restoration Movement
This graduate course unit explores the theological values and drivers of various Christian groups that have sought out a new way of expressing Christianity in their own context. By surveying the motives and historical setting of each of these groups a larger picture emerges of their common values. This course will have a particular emphasis on a group known as the Restoration Movement. The theological driver to seek fresh frontiers to explore the Christian faith, in new and practical ways, in an effective approach to Christian thought.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Evaluate, with a view to seeking the most significant, the theological features of various groups that throughout history have sought renewal, restoration, or reformation of the Church.
2. Analyse specific historical and sociological factors that have influenced change within Christianity.
3. Compare the theological similarities and differences of the groups studied.
4. Evaluate the theological emphases of the Restoration Movement.
5. Apply the insights of the Restoration Movement to the theological emphasis of contemporary ‘Frontier Thinkers,’ critiquing the strengths and weakness of new directions.

Students need to be able to grasp the concept that history is not just a chronological description of events but involves an interpretive element and a range of methodological approaches.

The content of this subject includes:
1. A survey of various historical movements that have sought to refresh, renew, restore, or radically challenge the Church.
2. The nature and key features of Primitive Church movements
3. The sociological factors that fuel the driver for change
4. A Special focus on the Restoration Movements around the world.
5. Contemporary movements that seek to find fresh ways to express the Christian faith
6. An exploration of where thinking that pushes frontiers might take the Church next.

H8594 – Study Tour
Israel, the Holy Land, or Palestine are names used by different people to described the same place – a place that is important to three of the world’s major faiths. This unit is based around your trip to Jordan and Israel and the opportunity that will provide you to connect what you will see with that which you have only ever read about.

This subject is designed to support your Tour in two ways;
1. Preparing you and your expectations for what you will experience on this Tour

2. Creating a historical framework in which to interpret and appreciate all that you will learn and experience.

CURRICULUM OBJECTIVES
This unit aims to provide students with the opportunity to spend a significant period of time in one or more remote locations relevant to the biblical, theological, historical or ministry narrative of theological texts and/or movements, in order to understand the impact of such locations on the interpretation of those narratives.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1) Analyse key contextual features which have contributed to the field under study;
2) Assess the relative importance of various local historical, geographical or cultural features in terms of their positive or negative contribution to the particular narrative within the field under study;
3) Critically analyse a specific topic within the field under study in terms of its local origin and its subsequent broader development;
4) Reflect on the impact of the travel experience on their personal development and theological and/or ministry understanding within the field under study;
5) Produce a presentation depicting the connection between the location visited and the narrative within the field under study, with a focus on an application to contemporary theological understanding and/or practice.

CONTENT
Section A: Preparation

Students will gain a familiarity with the historical elements of major sites to be visited. This will involve a significant guided reading program, which has been prepared by the college. This material is provided in the 5 Sessions of the Unit.

Section B: Tour
Students will spend two weeks in the Holy Land, under approved faculty supervision and direction, to explore the historical significance of key sites.
The Tour will include;
1. Lectures, visits, meetings with significant local people and cultural experiences in a cohesive program lead by an ACOM endorsed faculty member.
2. A Journal as part of the documentary evidence for the Study Tour experience
3. A final presentation and reflection detailing the key elements and significance of the Tour.

The SCD Guidelines for Study Tours are to be followed.

A8501 – Critical Thinking and Writing
This foundational course unit provides structured, practical instruction in the nature and skills of critical thinking and writing in a theological context. It is an excellent course for beginning students, especially for those who have not studied at higher education level recently. Although overall critical thinking and writing skills will be taught, the primary application of these skills will be in the area of writing excellent essays.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. demonstrate an advanced understanding of the nature of critical thinking, memory, and the relationship between thought and knowledge;
2. critically analyse arguments, draw deductively valid conclusions in the context of complex argumentation, critically analyse qualitative and quantitative data;
3. explore the nature of creative thinking and hypotheses testing and demonstrate a pronounced ability to apply critical thinking skills to research and essay writing;
4. widely access research repositories and assess their relevance for particular purposes and organise research data in a systematic and coherent fashion;
5. demonstrate the worth of personal systems or processes utilised for critical writing and research.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Critical Thinking
2. The acquisition, retention and retrieval of knowledge, including theological knowledge
3. Reasoning: critical construction, drawing deductively valid conclusions, assessing relevance of arguments and sources
4. Analysis arguments
5. Analysing qualitative and quantitative data
6. Critical thinking in research and writing
7. Accessing and assessing research sources and databases
8. Organising research findings
9. Conventions and presentation

A8530 – Introduction to Biblical Languages
This graduate course unit gives an introduction to biblical Hebrew and Greek that will enable students to use various grammatical and lexical tools without requiring a fluency in the language. This will enable them to use with discernment English-language translations for exegesis.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Recognise the alphabet and language structure of biblical Hebrew and Greek
2. Understand the nuances of the grammatical structures of the biblical languages
3. Evaluate English language translations in the light of the various language tools studied
4. Competently utilise an English language translation and various grammatical/lexical tools in exegesis
5. Apply the results of their study to enrich Christian life and ministry

The content of this subject includes:
1. Introductory hermeneutical theory
2. Translation theory and practice
3. Introducing biblical Hebrew and Greek
4. Parts of speech and language structure
5. Simple sentence diagramming
6. Using reference works and word studies
7. Evaluating and using English language translations
8. Sample exegesis from an OT and an NT book

S8501 – Spiritual Formation 4

This graduate unit provides the student with the opportunity to critically reflect on personal spiritual formation and its centrality in advancing their leadership quality and professionalism.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1) Understand a body of formational knowledge drawn from Theological, Spiritual and Psychological sources which serve to illuminate and transform a leader’s life journey.
2) Apply their knowledge of spiritual disciplines as well as rank their preferred pathways that stimulate increased transformation on a personal level.
3) Discriminate and distinguish between authentic expressions of self and inauthentic expressions of self and resultant impacts on their leadership
4) Formulate a rhythm of activity that ensures a balance between engagement and withdrawal from others in the life of a leader
5) Appraise the level of priority and the practice of spiritual habits in forming their leadership effectiveness

The threshold concept to be acquired in this unit is the leaders focus on personal spiritual formation determines their leadership effectiveness.

The content of this subject includes:
1) Autobiography of leaders.
2) The leaders sense of self: true & false self
3) Attractive qualities in leaders
4) Spiritual formation in the leader: Spiritual disciplines, prayer habits, preferred pathways to worship
5) Emotional formation & management in the leader
6) Personal boundaries required for effective leadership

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Formation in Christian Leadership

All Spiritual Formation units involve a three day retreat. This retreat revolves around telling life stories in the confidentiality of your Formation Group (4 – 8 students). You may well find these life stories challenging, encouraging or simply moving- not necessarily easy to tell or hear, but vital for growth both individually and as a group.

Attendance at the retreat is compulsory for this unit, and an assessable reflective paper will be written on your experiences there.

The retreat is a highlight of the student’s spiritual formation year. Formation groups are not open for additional students to join after the retreat has been held.

Note: Retreat registration occurs automatically when you register for Spiritual Formation (there is no additional cost to attend the retreat).

S8502 – Introduction to Christian Spirituality

This subject introduces students to the study of Christian Spirituality, focussing on the biblical, theological and historical foundations of Christian Spirituality, and their application to ministry and mission through the art of soul-care.

1. Construct a developed understanding of what is meant by the term ‘spirituality’ in light of contemporary pursuits in spirituality;
2. Categorise and critique the historical and cultural influences upon the development of Christian Spirituality;
3. Substantiate the specific nature of Christian Spirituality and personally formulate its primary characteristics at the service of leading others in spiritual formation;
4. Interpret various historical and contemporary kinds of spiritual disciplines or practices within the Christian tradition within their biblical and theological frameworks;
5. Apply insights from a variety of expressions in Christian spirituality to their own spiritual formation and practice

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Christian Spirituality

S9601 – Spiritual Formation 5

This advanced graduate course unit examines the theory and practice of developing healthy relationships. It offers the student the capacity to critique the health of their relationships and reflect on the critical connection between relational health & ones spiritual formation.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1) Demonstrate advanced knowledge of established theories on relational wellbeing and how relational wellbeing colours ones view of self, others and God.
2) Apply knowledge of contemporary research and perspectives on how Christian virtues build relational wellbeing
3) Critically reflect on personal relating habits.
4) Using advanced communication skills and applying established theories, articulate one’s formational life story highlighting how key relationships influenced faith development.
5) Apply the research and utilize communication skills to enhance the wellbeing of all present relationships including ones relationship with God.

The threshold concept to be acquired in this unit is the Trinitarian relationship as a model for relational health.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Relational theory and spirituality
2. Christian virtue development
3. Emotional, Social & Contemplative Intelligence
4. Sexuality & Spirituality
5. A Trinitarian Model of Relationship
6. Analysis of personal relationships habits at home, at work, at church with God.
7. Skills to improve relationships: Spiritual autobiography, accountability and journaling

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Relational Health in Spiritual Formation

All Spiritual Formation units involve a three day retreat. This retreat revolves around telling life stories in the confidentiality of your Formation Group (4 – 8 students). You may well find these life stories challenging, encouraging or simply moving- not necessarily easy to tell or hear, but vital for growth both individually and as a group.

Attendance at the retreat is compulsory for this unit, and an assessable reflective paper will be written on your experiences there.

The retreat is a highlight of the student’s spiritual formation year. Formation groups are not open for additional students to join after the retreat has been held.

Note: Retreat registration occurs automatically when you register for Spiritual Formation (there is no additional cost to attend the retreat).

S9695 – Discerning God’s Will Together

This unit explores the practices and principles of seeking after God’s will as a community. How does God guide us individually, as a team, an organisation or even a movement? How can we best open ourselves to God so that we collectively hear Him?

Further information on this subject will be released at a later date.

L8501 – Introduction to Christian Worship
This graduate course unit introduces students to concepts that provide a foundation for the study of Christian worship.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the biblical, theological, cultural and historical foundations for the practice of Christian worship within a particular tradition
2. Contrast recent developments within Christian worship
3. Critically analyse a range of liturgical resources, as a basis for further research
4. Compare the framework of various liturgical services
5. Differentiate the riches of the Christian liturgical traditions

The content of this subject includes:
1. The biblical basis for Christian worship
2. The theology of Christian worship
3. The role of culture in the development of worship
4. The historical developments in Christian worship
5. Current issues in Christian worship
6. Preparation of a Christian worship service

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Introducing Christian Worship

L8520 – Preaching 1
This unit provides an introduction to the art and science of preaching. Principally students will be taught one clear style of preaching, the strategy outlined by Andy Stanley in his book, our text for the unit, Communicating for a Change. Although this is very simple it allows enormous diversity in practice. This unit will be helpful for people who have never preached and those with years of experience.

Critical to the unit will be the experience of preaching to a live audience in a facilitation with other students. For those who cannot get to a facilitation, another live audience will need to be found. The audience then will then be asked to complete feedback forms and your video will need to be recorded and uploaded to youtube or similar. This will be all be a valuable experience, as you will receive helpful, encouraging, positive feedback that will help you to see sides of your preaching that you are blind to.

This unit starts with the foundation that preaching is important, the gospel is life-changing and God’s word is worth proclaiming. Please take the time to learn the art and science of preaching well.

By the successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

1. apply theological and theoretical principles to distinguish quality preaching of homilies/sermons
2. appraise a service of worship and explain the place of the homily/sermon
3. differentiate between written discourse and oral discourse and explain their interrelationship
4. demonstrate a range of preaching styles
5. prepare and deliver sermons/homilies that are creative and exhibit a basic structure that fits the context.

SESSIONS TOPIC
1 The Goal of Preaching
2 Method, Manner and Megaphones
3 The Big Idea
4 Outlines and Maps
5 Know Your Stuff
6 Engaging Your Audience
7 Know Your Audience
8 Develop Your Own Style
9 Finding the Big Idea
10 Missional Preaching

L9620 – Preaching 2
At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. appraise contemporary social and cultural context, extrapolate future trends, and forecast future trends in preaching
2. generalise the principles underlying effective preaching in particular contexts
3. creatively design sermons or homilies incorporating variations in style and structure
4. critique sermons or homilies with reference to their theological, social, and cultural context
5. preach sermons or homilies that effectively communicate in different contexts.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Contextual issues in preaching
2. 21st Century: post-modern, post-structural, pseudo-modern?
3. Styles of preaching: cognitive and affective; inductive and deductive
4. Structures in preaching: declarative, pragmatic, narrative, visionary, integrative
5. Communication techniques and context

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Preaching and Context

M8509 – Introduction to Discipleship

This unit will introduce students to Biblically grounded and culturally adapted approaches to following Jesus in the contemporary context. It will investigate theories and practices of discipleship, spiritual transformation and disciple making for the 21st century.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. critically appraise the Biblical material and theological issues relating to discipleship
2. explain why and how different approaches to making disciples are employed in differing cultural and contextual situations.
3. explain the role and place of a disciple in the public arena
4. construct a contextually adapted discipleship pathway for a given setting
5. integrate theories of discipleship with personal critical reflection on the foundational importance and practical application of discipleship to Christian life and ministry

The content of this subject includes:
1. The Biblical basis for discipleship
2. Disciple making as a lifestyle
3. The influence of society and culture on discipleship
4. The role of spiritual practices in the maturity and development of a disciple.
5. A strategy for disciple making in the local congregation.
6. From personal growth to community transformation.

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Framework for Discipleship

M8595 – Intercultural Hermeneutics

This course unit provides an overview of contextualisation and missional hermeneutics. Focus is given to models, tools, processes and case studies for interpreting Scripture inter-culturally, appreciating global theology, and contextualising theology and ministry for various local contexts.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Models and maps of contextualisation
2. Biblical mandate for contextualisation
3. Missional hermeneutics
4. Guidelines and limits for contextualisation
5. Comprehensive and critical contextualisation
6. Conceptual tools for contextualising theology
7. Case studies from Australia and globally: facilitators, guides, heralds, pathfinders, prophets and restorers
8. Future trajectories
9. Applying contextualisation to student contexts

M8595 – Missional Spirituality
This unit will focus on the specific spirituality issues faced by people involved in pioneering mission to emerging global cultures. In relational to spirituality, it will relate to finding God outside the church and in strange places. Christian spirituality has been so tied to a Christendom mode of church, and as a result that we have become dualistic in our understanding of God, church and world. We divide life into sacred and secular, and God is found in one but not the other. This unit will seek to address this issue directly and help the student to reconceive his/her relationship to God and the world in a more holistic and biblical way.
We will also explore the nature and essential character of discipleship in relation to the cultural situations and the alternative religions of our day. We will focus particularly on consumerism as the major religious alternative to Christianity in our day.
Finally, because missional work is difficult, we will explore the whole concept of sustainability – staying in there for the long haul and developing disciplines and structures for sustainable mission.This unit presents new models of spirituality, consistent and sustainable for mission in a post-modern context.
The original Content Providers who wrote this unit are Alan Hirsch, Michael Frost and Darren Cronshaw.

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED READING
Beaudoin, Tom, Virtual Faith: The Irreverent Spiritual Quest of Generation X (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1998).
Frost, Michael, Eyes Wide Open: Seeing God in the Ordinary (Sydney: Albatross, 1998).
Frost, Michael, and Hirsch, Alan, The Shaping of Things to Come: Innovation and Mission for the 21st Century Church (Peabody: Hendrickson Press, 2003), Section III on Messianic Spirituality.
Jones, Tony, Soul Shaper: Exploring Spirituality and Contemplative Practices in Youth Ministry (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2003).
Willard, Dallas, The Divine Conspiracy (San Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco, 1998).
Frost, Michael, Exiles: Living Missionally in a Post-Christian Empire (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 2006).

M9685 – Cross-Cultural Mission

This course unit explores worldview and intercultural communication from theological and practical perspectives. It will help students understand their own worldviews and those of others, and assist them in effective cross-cultural ministry and mission at home or abroad.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. examine the concept of culture, and explain principles of cross-cultural communication from an interdisciplinary perspective;
2. demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the theological and theoretical foundations of intercultural ministry and mission, with reference to recent developments in the field;
3. analyse a range of cross-cultural situations, discerning assumptions and values underlying surface cultural forms and behaviour;
4. develop culturally sensitive strategies for dealing with the complexities of cross-cultural ministry and mission;
5. apply principles learned in this unit to strengthening Christian ministry and mission in cross-cultural settings.

The basic anthropological distinction between form and function is critical to cross-cultural communication. Words or behaviours can mean different things in different cultures, and we must not assume they have the same meaning in another culture as they would in ours. The danger lies in equating our interpretation of observed behaviours with their actual meaning in another cultural context

The content of this subject includes:
1. Biblical and theological foundations of cross-cultural mission;
2. Culture and worldview; models of culture types;
3. Examining one’s own culture and worldview in comparison with others; the importance of adopting a learner’s posture and showing sensitivity in approaching other cultures;
4. Culture shock; reverse culture shock;
5. Modern communication theory: principles and terminology; perils of miscommunication; distinguishing form and function and the pitfalls of misattribution;
6. Aspects of cross-cultural communication, including language and non-verbal communication; relationship of medium and message; and the influence of social structures on communication;
7. Church and culture;
8. Contextualisation, indigenisation and enculturation in cross-cultural ministry and mission
9. Dealing with prejudice, racism and cross-cultural conflict

M9695 – Community Development

What does it mean for the people of God in the world to partner with God and others in the developing of His world for and towards His Kingdom? This unit seeks to expand our understanding of what God is doing in our world and how we can partner with him and others. All this is grounded in a methodology of community development that allows us to value those whom we are working with as co-labourers. We will also explore practical tools for this kind of engagement. At the end of the unit students will be able to articulate a clear theology for community development, be able to work towards employing an empowering methodology and have some practical on the ground skills for effective community engagement.

By the successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

· Discern and describe a theology of the Kingdom of God that is congruent with community development.

· Articulate an ecclesiology which allows the Church to engage meaningfully with its community and broader society

· Articulate an understanding of the Western context, issues of the developing world and the environment into which we are offering a community development response

· Discern and develop a methodology for community transformation that reflects Asset based Community Development (ABCD), rights based approaches and the importance of relationships

· Demonstrate an understanding and ability to engage in the project development cycle including research, design, implementation and evaluation

P9634 – Paradigms for Contemporary Mission

This course unit aims to introduce the student to the paradigm shifts required to recast the church in a genuinely missional stance in western cultural contexts.

At the end of this course unit students should be able to:
1) demonstrate a broad understanding of the significant cultural shifts that have occurred over the last few centuries, and the various responses of the church to these
2) demonstrate a developed understanding of a genuinely missional ecclesiology
3) display a well-developed ability to analyse culture and identify points of contact with the gospel
4) articulate a genuinely missional ecclesiology and show a commitment to achieve greater relevance to today’s non-Christian world.
5) Critically discuss the ‘remissionalisation’ of the church.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Theological Considerations
1.1. Christology and Incarnational Mission
1.2. Towards a Missional Ecclesiology
1.3. Justice and Integrity in Mission
2. Cultural Considerations and Mission
2.1. Major Shifts in Modern History
2.2. Chaos and Complexity
3. Tools for Missional Revolution
3.1. Viable Models Characteristics of the Missional Church
3.2. Action Learning Systems
3.3 Creativity and Imagination

The official SCD name for this unit is New Paradigms of Christian Mission

C8525 – Chaplain as Coach
Chaplains find themselves in many conversations where people just want to be listened to. What is the chaplain’s role here? To listen only? What skills are needed to make such conversations brilliant for both the chaplain and person? ‘Chaplain as Coach’ aims to develop these and other skills in chaplains so that these conversations are energising, inspiring and life changing.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. display a perceptive understanding of the philosophy behind PP and SFBT while applying and evaluating the theories and the practice of the these therapies.
2. investigate and analyse the empirical validation of these therapeutic interventions.
3. explore and analyse the role of happiness in positive psychology.
4. conduct interviews using PP and SFBT and demonstrate well-developed proficiency with each therapy.
5. apply professional competence in the process of integrating spirituality with the ideas and practice of PP and SFBT.

The threshold concept to be acquired in this unit is understanding the core tenets and skills of positive psychology and solution focused brief therapy prepares and equips the minister with an adequate repertoire of pastoral care.

The content of this subject includes:
1. The foundational principles of Solutions Focused Therapy
2. Challenge the assumptions around therapy
3. Negotiating a client.
4. How does a first interview work?
5. The miracle question, the scaling question, pre-suppositional questioning.
6. Happiness: Character Strengths and Virtues
7. Wisdom and knowledge
8. Courage
9. Love and humanity
10. Justice
11. Temperance
12. Spirituality and transcendence
13. Integrating with other models and evidence based research
14. Evidence Based research and practice.

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Solution Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT) & Positive Psychology (PP)

C8565 – Understanding and Working with Grief and Trauma
This graduate course unit aims to provide an overview of the key concepts and main theoretical approaches pertinent in the pastoral counselling of people experiencing grief, loss and trauma. It further examines normal and pathological grief processes and equips the pastoral practitioner accordingly.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. articulate Biblical perspectives on the nature of human relationships, family dynamics, and how suffering impacts the person.
2. critically evaluate culturally appropriate theories of pastoral counselling and interventions
3. outline in broad terms how to approach grief, loss, and trauma issues in pastoral care and counselling and differentiate between them.
4. appreciate and define the importance of research and pastoral counselling theory for effective and responsible pastoral care and counselling.
5. Address both the reactions of people facing issues related to the terminally ill, and various other significant losses, and appropriate and inappropriate forms of support, assistance and Pastoral Care and discriminate between them.

Pastoral care requires the pastoral practitioner to engage often with issues relating to grief and trauma. An extensive understanding of the processes of grief is essential for a pastoral practitioner to engage effectively with those in their care beyond the week of the funeral. Additionally an understanding of the ramifications of trauma is key to effective pastoral care as post-traumatic stress disorder effects greater numbers every year. Rudimentary skills in this arena will not suffice as the ecclesia becomes increasingly pertinent in each of these arenas.

Topics to be addressed will include most or all of the following:
1. the nature and stages of grief – emotional, physical and interpersonal aspects;
2. the nature and meaning of death — medical, cultural and biblical perspectives; the process of dying; relating to and meeting the needs of the dying and those caring for them; reasons for a funeral; a visit to a funeral parlour;
3. various causes of grief reactions, including bereavement and other significant losses, cultural patterns of grief and mourning;
4. recognising the dimensions of the normal uncomplicated grief process and facilitating normal grieving;
5. Pastoral counselling and care in relation to life crises and the terminally ill.
6. the needs of the dying, and the needs of those experiencing grief from various losses;
7. helpful and unhelpful support, and specific support groups;
8. abnormal grief reactions and their appropriate management;
9. strategies to prevent the pastoral prctitioner becoming over-involved and the pastoral practitioner’s personal grief;
10. basic crisis intervention skills including critical incident stress de-briefing; Trauma counselling strategies and techniques for varying contexts e.g:
a. suicide;
b. life-threatening scenarios;
c. long-term injury;
d. sickness;
e. homelessness;
f. victims of crime (including sexual assault, domestic violence, child abuse; alcoholic and drug abuse issues);
g. terrorism;
h. natural disaster.

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Pastoral Counselling: Grief, Loss and Trauma

C9695 – The Art and Science of Chaplaincy
This unit aims to equip the student to face the unique dilemmas, challenges and opportunities faced by chaplains in a wide variety of situations.

By the successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:
1. Show critical appreciation for the roles of self-differentiation, self-awareness and spirituality in effective people helping.
2. Appreciate the vital nature of working in team with others (chaplains, case workers, clinicians, managers, administrators and volunteers) in being a healthy and effective people helper.
3. Develop their own plans for professional development as key to their ongoing health, effectiveness and resilience as a chaplain.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Foundational skills of the chaplain
2. Self-awareness
3. Self-differentiation
4. Transdisciplinary relationships
5. Chaplaincy in a variety of contexts
7. Professional standards

P8502 – Issues and Ethics in Professional Practice
This graduate course unit examines the critical ethical and legal issues relevant to pastoral care and counselling.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Show a critical appreciation of the importance of ethics in the organisation and regulation of pastoral counselling practice;
2. Demonstrate thorough knowledge of the ethical responsibilities of pastoral practitioners and pastoral counsellors
3. Investigate, analyse and synthesise information pertaining to specific ethical issues of particular importance to pastoral counselling and care;
4. Demonstrate thorough knowledge of the models of ethical decision-making, in relation to pastoral care and counselling; and
5. Exhibit a well-developed competency and evaluation in the development and practice of ethical principles to their ecclesiological setting or pastoral counselling practice.

Professional Ethics and Issues in the helping occupations have become exceedingly important as we traverse the legal parameters of the twenty first century. Today’s pastoral practitioner must be adept in this area; having a sound understanding and a concrete grasp of the ethical strictures of counselling in a pastoral care context.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Ethical systems
2. Christian ethical systems;
3. Ethical issues in relation to clients’ and parishioners’ rights and pastoral practitioner responsibilities including but not restricted to
a. position,
b. power,
c. politics,
d. confidentiality, and
e. dual relationships
4. Ethical issues in theory, practice and research; emphasis on Evidence Based research and practice.
5. Organisational and professional ethics including but not restricted to
a. legislation and regulations
b. organisational policies and standards and
c. codes of practice.

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Foundations of Ethical Professional Practice

P8501 – Introduction to Pastoral Care

This course unit is an introduction to pastoral and practical theology for ministry. It is also an opportunity to overview the biblical and theological foundations of ministry. Common aspects of ministry will be considered.

At the end of the unit students will be able to:
1. demonstrate advanced knowledge of the contemporary complex issues relating to the practice of pastoral care
2. present a critical evaluation of the role of the human sciences in pastoral theology and ministry
3. apply advanced critical skills and insights of biblical and theological scholarship to the practice of ministry
4. demonstrate mastery of complex theological reflection in the practice of ministry
5. use technical and communication skills to independently analyse professional practice

The threshold concept to be acquired in this unit is the interdisciplinary nature of pastoral theology and evaluation of professional practice.

The content of this subject includes:
1. The theological, epistemological and biblical foundations of pastoral theology
2. Aspects of church ministry: Church structures and caring ministry
3. Key methodologies: Human sciences
4. Developing basic listening skills
5. Theological reflection on contemporary pastoral issues
6. Methods of ministry and the place of ordination / leadership

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Introduction to Pastoral and Practical Theology

P8510 – Foundations for Youth Ministry

This graduate course unit is an introduction to the practice of youth ministry. It seeks to encourage students to think differently about how to best minister to this post-modern generation. Students will be introduced to ideas and principles applicable to many different contexts and tools to evaluate and implement these principles.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Demonstrate advanced understanding of the nature and strategic task of youth ministry within the church.
2. Interpret and compare the various philosophies and principals of youth ministry to the ministry of the local church.
3. Assess and critique the theory and practice behind the various models for youth ministry & how to apply them to a local setting.
4. Derive and formulate the process for analysing the current context of a group with a view to setting and communicating vision and goals for the ministry in order to move forward.
5. Collect and compare new ideas to effectively reach and minister to the youth of the 21st century

The content of this subject includes:
1) Biblical foundations
2) Defining Youth Ministry
3) Clarifying a Call to Ministry
4) Philosophy of Youth Ministry
5) Models for Youth Ministry
6) Getting started – Strategic Programming
7) The Principles of Programming
8) Prayer as a Foundation for Youth Ministry
9) Setting Vision and Goals for Youth Ministry
10) Schools Ministry

P8511 – Developing a Youth Ministry

This course unit provides students with strategies for establishing a culture of discipleship and leadership development within the youth group. The unit guides them in the practice of recruiting and training youth leaders as well as building student leaders.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Exhibit an advanced understanding of the key principles and strategies for making disciples in youth ministry.
2. Understand knowledge of recent developments in the area of faith development & discipleship in youth.
3. Exhibit an advanced understanding and professional practice of the importance of developing a relational approach to youth ministry.
4. Exercise advanced skills in applying models for equipping youth for leadership and ministry.
5. Apply knowledge and skills with creativity and initiative in the area of discipleship and mentoring of young people and leaders.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Foundations for Making Disciples
2. Unleashing Potential in Youth
3. Relational Youth Ministry
4. Small Groups, Follow-up and Nurture
5. Equipping Youth for Ministry
6. Equipping Youth for Ministry – Techniques
7. Equipping Youth for Mission
8. Equipping Youth for Leadership
9. Mentoring Youth to Spiritual Maturity
10. Youth Ministry Development
11. Camps, Retreats and Mission Trips well done
12. Developing a Culture of Evangelism

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Developing Youth Ministry

P8512 – Children’s Ministry

This course seeks to address the value of ministry with children within the wholistic context of the family and the faith community, believing that scripture teaches us that this is the best model of helping a child’s faith formation develop in a solid and strong way. We long to see children grow and develop a lifelong faith that helps them become the adults God intended them to be.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of this unit students will be able to:

1) Articulate an advanced understanding of the theory and concepts of children’s ministry as a missional activity of the local Church

2) Critically analyse a variety of children‘s ministry professional practices and approaches in congregational, family and community settings

3) Evaluate the established theories of the learning characteristics, overall development and appropriate stages of faith of children, with reference to specific ministry contexts

4) Use and evaluate a variety of contemporary resources and techniques to nurture, manage, and ensure safety in children’s ministry in a range of congregational, family and community settings

5) Develop and evaluate effective programs for implementation in children’s ministry in their specific context.

CONTENT
1) Biblical and theological perspectives on the faith formation of a child.
2) Intergenerational Christian formation practices
3) Developing the family-at-the-centre approach to faith formation.
4) Children’s ministry in the way of Jesus.
5) The Church’s role in helping to raise spiritual champions.
6) A study of the learning characteristics and overall development of children.
7) Discipling Children at appropriate faith stages
8) Mission with children in communities of faith and in the world.
9) Behaviour management and safe Environments for working with children.
10) Effective Communication and techniques to nurture and engage children in the faith community.

P8583 – Team Ministry Skills

This course unit builds upon previous theoretical and applied reflections in previous units to assist in the development of leadership skills and will provide practical skills for increasing organisational effectiveness.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1) demonstrate an understanding of the nature and breadth of team leadership skills
2) exhibit an ability to relate various theories and skills to organisations
3) show an appreciation of the necessity of developing teams and applying leadership skills in organisations, and of enlarging the capacity and character of team members
4) display an understanding of personality differences and the ways in which these affect team relationships
5) show an appreciation of the overall impact a harmonious team in a larger church can have towards effective mission

The content of this subject includes:
1) The nature and importance of team building
2) The Myers-Briggs and other models which explain personality differences
3) Methods of teambuilding
4) Developing effective team communication skills
5) Priority setting and delegation
6) Supervising and appraising performance
7) Conflict management
8) Leading organisations through change

P8596*- Disciplemaking Movements 1: Paradigms for Disciplemaking Movements

It is the conviction of this course that in the life of Jesus we not only see the means of salvation, but in Jesus God gave us the very model for the Christian life and mission in the world. Jesus- fully God and fully Human is the great mystery of the incarnation. In his lived humanity he demonstrated the perfect model of a life lived in full obedience to the Father’s kingdom agenda in the world and fully dependant on the indwelling power of the Holy Spirit. Jesus did not simply live his life focused on the cross, but in his life he set in motion the Spirit-empowered movement that would carry the gospel of the kingdom into all ‘Judea, Samaria and to the ends of the World’ (Acts 1:8). Jesus gathered around him a group of followers whom he selected, invested himself in, trained, equipped and sent to continue the movement that he had begun. These first disciples were instructed to go into all the world, in the authority of Jesus, filled with the Holy Spirit, to ‘make disciples of all nations, baptising them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit and teaching them to obey everything’ he had commanded (Matt 28:19f). As the Father had sent Jesus, so he sent his followers and this process continues wherever the Gospel of the kingdom is proclaimed. The Church, at its heart, is to embody the continuing mission of Jesus- a disciple-making movement that sees the world as its mission field.

All too often the church has been distracted from this core mission of making disciples and in our contemporary climate it is no different. People seek for the latest model that will make their church, mission or ministry grow and be effective. We desire instant results and quick fixes to our struggling programs. Ultimately though, Jesus’ movement of Disciple-Making is not a quick fix, or an instant result, but it is our model for the church. It is in his life, teaching, mission and ministry that we see what we are to be like and on what we are to focus.

This course builds the foundations for developing a disciplemaking framework drawn from the life of Jesus. It will help students form a missional hermeneutic for engaging with the Gospels and Acts. Students will draw core principles from the unfolding process of Jesus’ disciple-making and apply them in their own context.

This unit is part of the SHIFTm2M process, a year-long learning experience which explores the practicality of seeing Jesus’ mission through his priority of building a disciple-making movement. Students engaging in this unit must be, or have been, participating in the SHIFTm2M process.

Much of the content provided in this course is originally created by SonLife Classic USA, and is authorised for use in Australia through Campus Crusade for Christ Australia under the name ‘SHIFTm2M’.

1. The need for a biblical Disciplemaking philosophy

2. Imitatio Christi- Christ as our model for life and ministry.

3. Establishing a Christocentric model for Disciplemaking

4. Ministry preparation and understanding the mission of Jesus and the Church in the world.

5. Ministry Preparation and developing a disciplemaking framework.

6. Understanding and developing the purpose, passion, product and process for disciplemaking.

7. Establishing foundational priorities for disciplemaking environments.

8. Equipping believers for participating in disciplemaking

9. Transforming from ministry to a philosophy of movements

*Please note: This unit is only available to students who are part of the SHIFTm2M cohort.
For further information about joining a cohort, please contact the National Office.

P9662 – Mastering Change

This graduate course unit acknowledges that students live their lives in times of change, and perform their ministries as agents of change for the sake of the gospel. It seeks to equip students to understand the dynamics of change in history, in institutions, and in their private lives. This unit seeks to equip students to understand change positively, and to master it as a tool for Christian ministry.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Construct an advanced model of how change is given effect from biblical and theological foundations
2. Critique recent developments of alternative theories about how change-movements are conceived, implemented and managed
3. Organise change as a positive feature in their own professional practice of leadership
4. Introduce transformational change within their own circles of influence and assist others to embrace and grow through change
5. Explain their own critical appreciation of personal and organisational change as an opportunity for growth and service

The content of this subject includes:
1. Introduction to change: metaphors and morphologies
2. ‘Mastering’ change: case studies from the biblical texts
3. Dealing with change: ‘clock builders’ versus ‘time tellers’
4. Change, time and movement: spiritual and emotional issues
5. Mastering change at an organisational level
6. Designing and implementing organisational change: projects and case studies

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Mastering Change in Ministry

M9695 – Becoming a Missional Leader

This graduate course unit examines the nature and practice of leadership which has personal and organisational transformation as its primary object. Participants will be challenged to develop a biblical model of leadership based on Jesus’ ministry, and to develop an intentional strategy for their own ongoing spiritual and personal nourishment.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Categorise personal leadership styles in the light of biblical, historical and business models
2. Critically evaluate alternative models of transformational leadership
3. Explain in detail the link between personal renewal and corporate revitalisation
4. Prescribe and justify the appropriate transformational intervention for an organisation according to its organisational lifecycle stage
5. Create and implement a comprehensive intentional strategy, grounded in careful research, for personal spiritual growth and corporate renewal

The content of this subject includes:
1. The traits, functions and styles of a leader
2. Character and ministry formation of a leader
3. Transformational and transactional leadership
4. Biblical models of transformational leadership
5. Transformational leadership and the lifecycles of movements
6. The gospel as a life-giving reality and ministry as a life-giving activity

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Transformational Leadership in Ministry

P8582 – Supervised Ministry 1

There are 2 Supervised Ministry Units, of 9 credit points each. It is expected that students will enrol in both units. Students should enrol in both at the start of the year, and will receive access to the unit information in trimester 1. However, they will technically be enrolled in Supervised Ministry 1 in trimester 2, and Supervised Ministry 2 in trimester 3. Students will be expected to work on the units throughout the year.

This graduate course unit incorporates learning experiences at a practical level as well as giving opportunity to reflect on both the practice and theory of ministry. This reflection occurs with both an appointed supervisor and mentor as well as the formal classroom situation. The mentoring would be with experienced ordained pastors or those in recognised specialist ministries.

At the end of the unit students should be able to:
1. identify the key features of the support systems necessary to maintain a successful placement
2. demonstrate a critical understanding of the issues involved in interacting within the mentoring and classroom situation
3. incorporate the supervisory process and personal journaling as a means of critical self-evaluation
4. demonstrate a sound level of practical involvement and initiative in the process of practical church ministry
5. appreciate the value and process of being mentored as means of personal growth

The content of this subject includes:
1. Ministry placement
2. Involvement in the process of mentoring and theological reflection with an appointed supervisor
3. Seminars and group interaction
4. The theory and the practice of pastoral ministry
5. Develop an initial personal ministry profile
6. Legalities of pastoral ministry (e.g. Regulation check lists for children’s workers)

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Theory and Practice of Ministry 1

P9682 – Supervised Ministry 2

There are 2 Supervised Ministry Units, of 9 credit points each. It is expected that students will enrol in both units. Students should enrol in both at the start of the year, and will receive access to the unit information in trimester 1. However, they will technically be enrolled in Supervised Ministry 1 in trimester 2, and Supervised Ministry 2 in trimester 3. Students will be expected to work on the units throughout the year.

This graduate course unit incorporates learning experiences at a practical level as well as giving opportunity to reflect on both the practice and theory of ministry. This reflection occurs with both an appointed supervisor mentor as well as the formal classroom situation. The mentoring would be with experienced ordained pastors or those in recognised specialist ministries.

At the end of the unit students should be able to:
1. appraise the key features of the support systems necessary to maintain a successful ministry in the context of a placement
2. develop a critical understanding of the issues involved in interacting within the mentoring and classroom situation
3. evaluate the supervisory process and personal journaling as a means of critical self-evaluation and personal growth
4. Reflect on and develop an ongoing personal ministry profile;
5. demonstrate an advanced level of practical involvement and initiative in the process of practical church ministry

The content of this subject includes:
1. Substantial ministry placement
2. Critical involvement in the process of mentoring and theological reflection with an appointed supervisor
3. Seminars and group interaction
4. The theory and the practice of pastoral ministry
5. Identity an initial personal ministry profile
6. Legalities of pastoral ministry (e.g. Regulation check lists for children‘s workers)

Please note the official SCD name for this subject is: Theory and Practice of Ministry 2

X8500 – Research Methodology

This graduate course unit introduces students to the procedures and skills required to research a topic, critically evaluate research materials, organise information, and prepare a research proposal. It focuses on the research, organisation, ethical issues, and writing skills that the student will need to prepare an acceptable research essay or thesis. Applicants for Sydney College of Divinity research degree programs are required to have completed this unit at distinction level or demonstrate equivalence in achievement.

X8500 Research Methodology is a 9 credit point unit. It is a prerequisite for X9691/X96922 Research Project(s), X9696/X9690 Research Essay(s), and X8598 Honours thesis but may be taken by any qualified student.

A supervisor is appointed for each student, usually the ACOM Head of Department – Research, or a faculty member with expertise in researching the student’s proposed topic.

Upon enrolment, students need to select which discipline or sub-discipline in which to enrol for this unit. That is, a student can study this as B8500 Research Methodology (Biblical Studies), T8500 Research Methodology (Theology), P8500 Research Methodology (Pastoral Theology) etc. The discipline or sub-discipline of study should be the same discipline in which the student intends to complete their Research Project or Essay.

At the end of this unit the student should be able to:
1. demonstrate a competent knowledge of the specific area of the student’s research question.
2. demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the standard procedures, materials, and relevant ethical issues required in the area(s) of specialisation to assemble adequate resources that respond to the student’s research question.
3. demonstrate advanced skills in researching a topic and organising information with a view to the production of an acceptable essay proposal.
4. produce a professional research essay in proper format, including the correct referencing of sources used in the preparation of the essay and scrupulous detailing of information in footnotes and bibliography.
5. understand all aspects of research from the presentation of a proposal, critical evaluation of materials investigated, organisation of information in a logical and relevant outline, clear presentation if ideas in the form of a written essay, all under the supervision of a mentor and finally the external review of the results by experts in the field.

Research and writing on a professional level requires the rigorous application of appropriate methods and procedures to clearly present the fruit of research to an audience of one’s peers.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Methods of academic research and writing: quantitative and qualitative analysis, exegetical methodologies, etc.
2. Methods of assembling a bibliography of current, relevant resources for the topic of the research essay.
3. Methods of data gathering and analysis.
4. Review of the key bibliographic (and other) resources within the discipline specialisation of the student researcher.
5. Selecting the topic, planning the research project, and writing a proper research and ethics proposal.
6. Academic standards for referencing, for essay formatting and for writing style.

X9693 – Independent Guided Study (9 credit point)

This graduate course unit enables students with initiative and creativity to pursue ideas and areas of interest in a subject area. It affords the student an opportunity to develop independent research and study skills.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. identify for themselves a question to be posed or a topic to be investigated in the particular subject area,
2. describe advanced methods for resolving the question or for researching the topic,
3. outline a working bibliography for the area of their research,
4. show advanced competence in descriptive, critical and analytic skills with respect to the topic of their research,
5. produce a report (or reports) that is clearly expressed, well argued, and has potential for publication.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Process for choosing topic of interest.
2. Process for determining selection of necessary research skills.
3. Process for selection of sources of information that assist and guide the development of necessary research skills.
4. Process for obtaining approval by the appropriate academic authority in the MI to proceed with the unit.

X9694 – Independent Guided Study (18 credit point)

This graduate course unit enables students with initiative and creativity to pursue ideas and areas of interest in a subject area. It affords the student an opportunity to develop independent research and study skills.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. identify for themselves a question to be posed or a topic to be investigated in the particular subject area,
2. describe advanced methods for resolving the question or for researching the topic,
3. outline a working bibliography for the area of their research,
4. show advanced competence in descriptive, critical and analytic skills with respect to the topic of their research,
5. produce a report (or reports) that is clearly expressed, well argued, and has potential for publication.

The content of this subject includes:
1. Process for choosing topic of interest.
2. Process for determining selection of necessary research skills.
3. Process for selection of sources of information that assist and guide the development of necessary research skills.
4. Process for obtaining approval by the appropriate academic authority in the MI to proceed with the unit.

X9699 – Capstone Unit

This capstone course unit provides an opportunity for students to integrate what they have previously learned in the major area of study, in other course units that formed part of the degree, and in their life experiences beyond the formal course of study. It enables students to demonstrate a broad mastery of learning across the curriculum, to consider its application in future life situations, and to plan further learning experiences designed to complement and extend their current levels of understanding. It normally introduces little new content although it may introduce new methodologies and techniques.

A capstone unit may develop in many ways. It has the potential for various learning outcomes. The learning outcomes below are examples of typical learning outcomes.
At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. interrogate the disciplinary assumptions and intellectual history of their major area of study
2. reflect upon and articulate their personal reasons for studying and practising their particular area of theology and ministry
3. consider their personal experiences in studying theology and ministry in a broader social and critical context with a view to their future life experiences
4. engage in debate about the significance of theology to public discourse, and the relative merits of a formal education in studies in theology and ministry
5. construct an original argument in relation to a field of scholarly debate
6. support arguments with textual evidence using appropriate the critical skills
7. conduct formal textual analysis of works within their major area of study.
8. consolidate higher-level applied communication skills (written, oral, interpersonal, professional presentations)
9. apply theory to practice, work effectively in employment-related teamwork situations, and effectively use professional networking opportunities
10. demonstrate of early professional dispositions and ethical stance.

The class sessions include scaffolding students through the synthesis of their prior knowledge. They provide students with frameworks for planning, reflection, analysis, and synthesis. Sessions might include
1. development of realistic and feasible topics.
2. advice on the types of projects that could be undertaken and opportunities to discuss projects
3. guidance on development of plans for achieving outcomes and on completing projects or reports
4. assistance with working effectively and collaborating in a team,
5. risk management associated with students’ participation in authentic professional and industry settings.

X9691 – Research Project (9 credit point)
This graduate course unit builds on the theological background, capacity and interests of a student and enables her or him to pursue broad research, often of a survey nature, into an area or topic within a discipline or across disciplines. This research cannot usually be done within the strictures of individual coursework units or the focused study of a particular topic.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. demonstrate advanced knowledge of the area chosen within the disciplines being studied
2. demonstrate advanced skills of researching within a discipline and across disciplines where applicable
3. Investigate, analyse and synthesise complex information in the topic under consideration using the methodologies of the subject area/s
4. integrate the topic being studied into a wider framework with attention to theological, ministerial and social implications of the topic
5. use communication and technical research skills to justify and interpret theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Advanced students must learn to study special-interest topics independently according to a valid method of research and analysis.

This course unit permits students to research a topic of their own choosing in consultation with the lecturer.

X9692 – Research Project (18 credit point)
This graduate course unit builds on the theological background, capacity and interests of a student and enables her or him to pursue broad research, often of a survey nature, into an area or topic within a discipline or across disciplines. This research cannot usually be done within the strictures of individual coursework units or the focused study of a particular topic.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. demonstrate advanced knowledge of the area chosen within the disciplines being studied
2. demonstrate advanced skills of researching within a discipline and across disciplines where applicable
3. Investigate, analyse and synthesise complex information in the topic under consideration using the methodologies of the subject area/s
4. integrate the topic being studied into a wider framework with attention to theological, ministerial and social implications of the topic
5. use communication and technical research skills to justify and interpret theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Advanced students must learn to study special-interest topics independently according to a valid method of research and analysis.

This course unit permits students to research a topic of their own choosing in consultation with the lecturer.

X9696 – Research Essay (18 credit point)
This graduate course unit enables students to develop specialized knowledge and skills in a particular discipline by research that demonstrates their capacity to proceed to further professional practice or highly skilled learning.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Exhibit a body of knowledge that includes understanding for cent developments in one or more disciplines.
2. Employ advanced knowledge of research principles and methods applicable to their field of research.
3. Investigate, analyse and synthesize complex information, problems, concepts or theories.
4. Convey in coherent and sustained argument, in modes appropriate to the research discipline and to various specialist or non-specialist audience, the results of research.
5. Apply knowledge and skills creatively and with considerable independence to new situations and /or for further learning.

The threshold concept to be acquired in this unit is management of the creative tension between independent research and accountability to the established parameters of an academic discipline or professional practice.

This course unit permits students to research a topic of their own choice in consultation with a supervisor appointed by the appropriate body of the Member Institution.

X9698 – Action Research Project (18 credit point)
This graduate course enables the student to develop competency in a research approach that enhances their ability to reflect, inquire and act in diverse ministry/work contexts. As these contexts are usually complex the research encourages the student to work in a framework that integrates their learning across multiple disciplines.

At the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Plan, implement and evaluate a substantial research project that integrates established theory, professional practice, and personal development
2. Synthesise current literature within the fields of the research project
3. Exercise advanced, autonomous leadership in a complex work/ministry-based context and apply established theories to the action being observed
4. Utilise deep reflective practice to observe actions (self and others) and plan for continuous improvement within the framework of best practice action research (multiple cycles of planning, acting, observing and reflecting)
5. Establish the research findings as reliable and trustworthy in accordance with best practice action research

The content of this subject includes:
1. Introducing the action research approach
2. Engaging stakeholders as co-researchers
3. Researching action
4. Integration of theory and practice
5. Recording and analysing the three unique contributions: development of self, development of organisation, and contribution to the body of knowledge